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I'm trying to figure out how inheritance and polymorphism is handled in C++, it seems its a little different than what I'm used to in Java. I'm trying to return a base class in one of the functions, but when the return is received, I would like the object to be the derived class. However it is not working out as expected for me.

#include "Prefixer.h"
using namespace std;

Prefixer::Prefixer( Lexer l ){
    lexer = l;
}

Expr Prefixer::expr() {
    Expr left = term();
    Expr right = termTail();
    cout << left.name();
    cout << right.name();
    return left;
}

Expr Prefixer::term() {
    NullExpr temp;
    return temp;
}

Expr Prefixer::termTail() {
    NullExpr temp;
    return temp;
}

But the returned left.name() and right.name() both calls the Expr's (the base class) virtual name() function :C. How can I make it so that they call the overloaded name() functions from the derived class NullExpr?

string Expr::name() {
    return "expr";
}

string NullExpr::name() {
    return "null";
}
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Did you use "virtual " in Expr::name() method declaration? –  alexm May 28 '12 at 3:23
    
@alexm: Wouldn't matter unless a pointer or reference is used to call the functions. –  Alok Save May 28 '12 at 3:24
    
Re: "it seems its a little different than what I'm used to in Java" - A "little different" is quite an understatement. Pick up a good introductory C++ book and it will make way more sense. –  In silico May 28 '12 at 3:24
    
@Als - yes, thanks for the correction - overlooked slicing in this example –  alexm May 28 '12 at 3:25

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your problem starts in this code:

Expr Prefixer::term()
{
    NullExpr temp;
    return temp;
}

temp is a local variable, destroyed at the end of the function. The return value makes an Expr instance (because that's the return type) by copying the return expression, temp. The caller never sees a NullExpr object.

What Java does is essentially:

Expr* Prefixer::term()
{
    NullExpr* temp = new NullExpr;
    return temp;
}

but you mustn't blindly do that in C++, or you'll end up with memory leaks (Java has a garbage collector, C++ doesn't). You can free the memory using delete:

Expr* left = term();
left->name();
delete name;

A more recommended approach is to use smart pointers that automatically destroy the object when the last pointer to it disappears:

shared_ptr<Expr> Prefixer::term()
{
    NullExpr* temp = new NullExpr;
    return temp;
}
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You need to make left and right be Expr* or Expr&, not Expr.

Unlike Java, variables of a class type in C++ hold actual instances, not references to instances.

So when you do:

Expr left = term();

you are actually calling Expr's copy constructor, which will only make an instance of the base Expr class.

In Java, that's very different -- there you're just setting left to refer to some existing object, not creating a new.

Thus the need to have left and right be references or pointers -- so that the same thing happens in C++ that you're using to happening in Java.

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2  
Yep. Returning by value, rather than pointer or reference, leads to "slicing" of the object into the base type, the derived type is lost. –  tmpearce May 28 '12 at 3:23
1  
Not just the local variables, but also the return value, needs to be changed to avoid slicing. Which means also introducing dynamic allocation. –  Ben Voigt May 28 '12 at 3:24
    
Thanks for the help! I know the root of the problem now. However if I pass by value for the Expr left and right, how do I call the name() functions using left and right? right now I am getting an error like this: error: request for member ?name? in ?left?, which is of non-class type (Expr*) –  Jason Hu May 28 '12 at 3:30
    
@Jason: To access members of a pointer, use ->. Like left->name(). –  Ben Voigt May 28 '12 at 3:30
1  
There are a few other ways. For example, you can use a container that holds a value and copy-constructs it from its derived type when it's copied. Boost::any is such a container. You can also use a container that holds base* and calls a virtual duplicate function to copy. –  David Schwartz May 28 '12 at 3:39

To use the method dynamic-binding(or invoke overloaded subclass method with a handle to base object) you should manipulate object with reference or pointer. If implemented like that, make sure the life of your returned object is long enough, so you can access it after the method terminates. You find it's different from Java, because all object in Java is indeed a reference to a storage on heap, instead the object itself.

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