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I am trying to write some basic input/output code to the terminal in Linux with NASM. I want to allow the user to input data but my problem is that I get a buffer overflow if the user enters more data than the buffer length. I am attempting to check if the inputted data is greater than the bufferlength and if so then ask the user to "Enter Data:" again.

Here is my current code:

SECTION .bss
        BUFFLENGTH equ 8 ;The max length of our Buffer
        Buff: resb BUFFLENGTH ;The buffer itself 
SECTION .data
 Prompt: db "Enter Data: ",10
 PromptLen: equ $-Prompt
SECTION .text 



    global _start
_start:

DisplayPrompt:
       mov eax, 4
       mov ebx, 1
       mov ecx, Prompt 
       mov edx, PromptLen
       int 80h
Read:
       mov eax, 3 ;Specify sys_read call
       mov ebx, 0; Specify File Descriptor 0 : STDIN (Default to keyboard input)
       mov ecx, Buff; pass offset of the buffer to read to
       mov edx, BUFFLENGTH ; Tell sys_read to read BUFFLEN 
       int 80h ;make kernel call
       mov esi, eax
       cmp byte[ecx+esi], BUFFLENGTH ;compare the returned bufferSize to BUFFLENGTH
       jnbe DisplayPrompt ;Jump If Not Below or Equal To BUFFLENGTH


Write:
       mov edx, eax ;grab the size of the buffer that was used (charachter length)
       mov eax, 4 ;specify sys_write
       mov ebx, 1 ; specify File Descriptor 1: STDOUT 
       mov ecx, Buff ;pass the offset of the Buffer 
       int 80h ;make kernel call

Exit:
       mov eax, 1 ; Code for Exit syscall
       mov ebx, 0 ; Exit code { = 0; Program ran OK }
       int 80h ; make kernel call

I believe my error is in how I am comparing the data, here:

 mov esi, eax
       cmp byte[ecx+esi], BUFFLENGTH ;compare the returned bufferSize to BUFFLENGTH
       jnbe DisplayPrompt ;Jump If Not Below or Equal To BUFFLENGTH

Any help would be appreciated. Thanks.

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You're telling read() to read 8 bytes, that's what it's going to do.. –  Michael Foukarakis May 28 '12 at 7:42
    
Okay but how then would I stop the bufferoverflow by limiting the user to only less than or equal to the buffer. At the moment when I run this program in terminal and say enter 9 bytes of data like so, this is my output: –  user1421161 May 28 '12 at 7:52
    
~/asmwork/messages $ ./messages Enter Data: 12345678910 12345678~/asmwork/messages $ 910 910: command not found –  user1421161 May 28 '12 at 7:54
1  
The data spills over into terminal instead of limiting the user to not enter more data than the bufferlength, any ideas? –  user1421161 May 28 '12 at 7:54
    
To put it simply, how exactly would I test the inputted data against say a string value of "exit" or "e" ? –  user1421161 May 28 '12 at 10:08

1 Answer 1

What you are calling "buffer overflow" here isn't the common definition of buffer overflow. If I understand correctly, what you are considering "buffer overflow" in this scenario is "The data spills over into terminal instead of limiting the user to not enter more data than the bufferlength". But in fact, the user can't enter more data than the buffer length. What is happening is that your read() reads 8 bytes from stdin and the remaining bytes "are still" in stdin where bash reads from when your program exits and the "\n" at the makes it try to execute the "spilling bytes" like you call them. There is no reason to change this since it's not a security issue at all. The user can't execute commands as the owner of the program that way. If you really wanted to get rid of this, you could use malloc() to allocate a 'big enough' buffer. That way no matter how much the user inputs, the buffer will be big enough (depending on how much RAM you have, etc.) and you won't see those "spilling bytes" anymore.

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