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(This question is similar to the one I recently posted here except that now I'm using CGEventPost to simulate more keystrokes instead of modifying current event)

The code bellow was able to insert an 'a' character every time the 'h' button is pressed, it worked fine with all the applications.

CGEventRef KeyHandler(CGEventTapProxy proxy, CGEventType type, CGEventRef event, void *refcon)
{
    UniCharCount actualStringLength;
    UniCharCount maxStringLength = 1;   
    UniChar chars[3];

    CGEventKeyboardGetUnicodeString(event, maxStringLength, &actualStringLength, chars);

    if (chars[0] == 'h') {

        CGEventRef keyEventDown = CGEventCreateKeyboardEvent( NULL, 1, true);
        CGEventRef keyEventUp = CGEventCreateKeyboardEvent( NULL, 1, false);

        chars[0] = 'a';
        CGEventKeyboardSetUnicodeString(keyEventDown, 1, chars);
        CGEventKeyboardSetUnicodeString(keyEventUp, 1, chars);
        CGEventSetIntegerValueField(keyEventDown, kCGKeyboardEventKeycode, 0); // 0 is key code of 'a' button
        CGEventSetIntegerValueField(keyEventUp, kCGKeyboardEventKeycode, 0);

        CGEventPost(kCGSessionEventTap, keyEventDown);
        CGEventPost(kCGSessionEventTap, keyEventUp);
        return NULL;
    }

    return event;
}

If I replace 'a' with backspace character, some applications (e.g. Microsoft Excel on Mac ... ) don't recognize it anymore. Do you have any idea why ?

CGEventRef KeyHandler(CGEventTapProxy proxy, CGEventType type, CGEventRef event, void *refcon)
{
    UniCharCount actualStringLength;
    UniCharCount maxStringLength = 1;   
    UniChar chars[3];

    CGEventKeyboardGetUnicodeString(event, maxStringLength, &actualStringLength, chars);

    if (chars[0] == 'h') {

        CGEventRef keyEventDown = CGEventCreateKeyboardEvent( NULL, 1, true);
        CGEventRef keyEventUp = CGEventCreateKeyboardEvent( NULL, 1, false);

        chars[0] = '\b';
        CGEventKeyboardSetUnicodeString(keyEventDown, 1, chars);
        CGEventKeyboardSetUnicodeString(keyEventUp, 1, chars);
        CGEventSetIntegerValueField(keyEventDown, kCGKeyboardEventKeycode, 51);
        CGEventSetIntegerValueField(keyEventUp, kCGKeyboardEventKeycode, 51);

        CGEventPost(kCGSessionEventTap, keyEventDown);
        CGEventPost(kCGSessionEventTap, keyEventUp);
        return NULL;       
    }

    return event;
}
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2 Answers

The "\b" escape sequence produces ASCII 0x08. In my testing, the event generated when I press the delete (i.e. backspace) key is ASCII 0x7f.

In general, that seems the obvious technique to use to figure out how to simulate an event. Perform that event with a tool that captures it and dumps its specifics.

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0x7f is ASCII value of DEL character, not Backspace. However if I add NSLog(@"%d",chars[0]); into my code, I can see number 8 appears in console log when pressing Backspace button. –  Huy Phan May 28 '12 at 9:04
    
The semantics of DEL are ambiguous. Cocoa uses it to mean "delete the character prior to the insertion point", which is backspace. Cocoa uses NSDeleteFunctionKey = 0xF728 for forward delete. Of course, you're seeing 8 when logging your own "\b". That's precisely what I said and it's precisely the problem. Write a Cocoa app which dumps the characters from NSEvents that it receives and see what it logs when you press the backspace key. It will be 0x7f. –  Ken Thomases May 28 '12 at 18:23
    
I'm seeing 8 when I purposely press Backspace button on my keyboard ;) Anyway, if value of Backspace is totally wrong as you said, how can it work with almost all other applications? –  Huy Phan May 28 '12 at 22:51
    
According to Apple docs : NSBackspaceCharacter = 0x0008, –  Huy Phan May 28 '12 at 22:58
    
How did you test? I have performed the test I stated. I wrote an app using a subclass of NSApplication with an override of -sendEvent:. In the override, I do if ([anEvent type] == NSKeyDown) NSLog(@"%#04x", [[anEvent characters] characterAtIndex:0]);. Also, what keyboard layout are you using? I'm using the U.S. layout. With respect to those docs you linked, they also have NSDeleteCharacter = 0x007f. –  Ken Thomases May 29 '12 at 0:04
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

Figured it out. If I remove the code to set unicode string for the events, everything will work just fine:

chars[0] = '\b';
CGEventKeyboardSetUnicodeString(keyEventDown, 1, chars);
CGEventKeyboardSetUnicodeString(keyEventUp, 1, chars);

However, I have no idea why this happens to some specific applications on Mac OS.

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