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This is from SICP Video Lectures, Lecture 2a around the 39:51 mark.

(DEFINE (SQRT X)
   (FIXED-POINT
      (AVERAGE-DAMP (LAMBDA Y (/ X Y)))
      1)) 

(DEFINE AVERAGE-DAMP
   (LAMBDA f
      (LAMBDA x (AVERAGE (f x) x))))

What does the x in the second lambda do in AVERAGE-DAMP and how is it being accessed? I don't understand what exactly is being passed to it.

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I don't have the lectures at hand. Are you sure the lambda in the call to AVERAGE-DAMP is not (LAMBDA Y (/ X Y))? –  Diego Sevilla May 28 '12 at 10:12
    
@DiegoSevilla I've been eyeing that too. It has to be Y for finding a fixed point and it being a square root to make sense (and syntactically unless Y is defined elsewhere). –  Corbin May 28 '12 at 10:14
    
Sorry, guys, you're right. I've corrected that. –  dotnetN00b May 28 '12 at 10:15

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted
(DEFINE AVERAGE-DAMP
   (LAMBDA f
      (LAMBDA x (AVERAGE (f x) x))))

The tricky thing about this is that a function is being passed around here.

average-damp is a function of f that is defined as a function of x that is defined as the average of f(x) ("f of x") and x.

In other words, average-damp is a function that accepts another function, wraps a function around it, then returns this new function.

If you're familiar with JavaScript by any chance, this may help:

function average(a, b) {
    return (a + b)/2;
}

function averageDamp(f) {
    return function(x) {
        return average(f(x), x);
    }
}

So now think about, what is the following?

var something = averageDamp(function (c) { return c * 2 });

something is a function that takes one parameter, x, and returns the average of x * 2 and x.

In other words, it's like:

function (x) {
    return average(x * 2, x);
}

If you had:

var something = averageDamp(function (c) { return c * 2 });
something(5); //average(5*2, 5) = (10 + 5) / 2

This wrapping a function inside of a function is what is happening with your lisp snippet.

Edit: out of curiosity, I completely implemented a fixed-point sqrt approach in JavaScript: http://jsfiddle.net/tXDQL/.

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is it 5 * 5 or 5 * 2? –  dotnetN00b May 28 '12 at 10:27
    
@dotnetN00b Ah! Whoops. It's 5*2. –  Corbin May 28 '12 at 10:27
    
I tried to run your jsFiddle. Nothing shows. –  dotnetN00b May 28 '12 at 19:48
    
@dotnetN00b That's because it doesn't output anything, but rather logs to the console. Here's a version that writes to a div: jsfiddle.net/tXDQL/1 –  Corbin May 28 '12 at 20:35
(DEFINE (SQRT X)
   (FIXED-POINT
      (AVERAGE-DAMP (LAMBDA Y (/ X Y)))
      1)) 

(DEFINE AVERAGE-DAMP
   (LAMBDA F
      (LAMBDA X (AVERAGE (F X) X))))

It might appear confusing at first, what I tried to help me clarify this when I was learning is to replace the "X" in the AVERAGE-DAMP with "Y". So that will help differentiate between the "X" as argument in SQRT.

(DEFINE (SQRT X)
   (FIXED-POINT
      (AVERAGE-DAMP (LAMBDA Y (/ X Y)))
      1)) 

(DEFINE AVERAGE-DAMP
   (LAMBDA F
      (LAMBDA Y (AVERAGE (F Y) Y))))

So what happens here is :
F -> (LAMBDA Y (/ X Y)),
then (F Y) -> (/ X Y),
then (AVERAGE-DAMP (LAMBDA Y (/ X Y))) -> (LAMBDA Y (AVERAGE (/ X Y) Y))

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AVERAGE-DAMP is just defined as a function (a lambda) that, when given a parameter f, returns another funciton (another lambda) that, when given a parameter x calculates the average of x and f(x), where f is the previously received function.

Then, in SQRT, note how AVERAGE-DAMP is just called with one parameter (that happens to be a function, a lambda). This converts the call into another function (the second lamda in AVERAGE-DAMP), that, given a value, evaluates that given funciton (LAMBDA Y (/ X Y)) to the given value. The FIXED-POINT function will take care of taking that function and evaluating the previous function for each the values it considers apropriate.

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The value of x will be the argument that fixed-point passes to the function.

Now you didn't supply the definition of fixed-point, but from the name I would would imagine, it will first call the function with the argument 1 (because that's what was given as the second argument to fixed-point) and will then continue to call the function with its previous result as the argument until the result is the same as the previous result.

So on the first invocation x would be 1, on the second it would be (average (f 1) 1), on the third it would be (average (f (average (f 1) 1)) (average (f 1) 1)) and so on.

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