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I use setdefault to count instances like this (this is the stripdown version):

user_to_count_map = {}
for username in list_of_usernames:
    x = user_to_count_map.setdefault(username, 0)
    x += 1
    user_to_count_map[username] = x + 1
for username in sorted(usernmae_to_count_map):
    print username, user_to_count_map[username]

I don't like the assigning back to the map, because the real code is more complex with multiple count increas. But I do seem to need to do that. Is there an easy way around that?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You could make the counter a list with one element, effectively making it a mutable:

user_to_count_map = {}
for username in list_of_usernames:
    x = user_to_count_map.setdefault(username, [0])
    x[0] += 1
for username, counter in sorted(user_to_count_map.items()):
    print username, counter[0]

I am not sure if that makes your code any more readable, as explicit is better than implicit.

Or if use python 2.7 or newer (or use a convenient backport), you could use a Counter object:

from collections import Counter
user_to_count_map = Counter()
for username in list_of_usernames:
    user_to_count_map[username] += 1
for username, counter in sorted(user_to_count_map.items()):
    print username, counter[0]        

Note that by using a Counter you have a dictionary that automatically gives you a default value of 0. It otherwise acts like a dictionary holding integer values, so you can increment and decrement these values any way you like (including adding more than 1).

The same effect can be had with defaultdict, also in the collections module, but note that the Counter class offers functionality. defaultdict is present in python 2.5 and up; example:

from collections import defaultdict
user_to_count_map = defaultdict(lambda: 0)
for username in list_of_usernames:
    user_to_count_map[username] += 1

Alternatively, you could just dispense with the setdefault altogether, as you are always assigning back to the mapping anyway:

user_to_count_map = {}
for username in list_of_usernames:
    x = user_to_count_map.get(username, 0)
    x += 1
    user_to_count_map[x] = x
for username, counter in sorted(user_to_count_map.items()):
    print username, counter[0]
share|improve this answer
    
Syntax error was present in the OP, corrected. :-) –  Martijn Pieters May 28 '12 at 10:19
    
@pieters thank you for correcting the type, cut&Paste is difficult with 4 extra spaces, so I typed. I think I will use the list syntax for a while. Nice is that x += 1 gives TypeError is x is a list! –  Gerard May 28 '12 at 12:04
    
@user1421439: SO makes pasting code easy; just paste, make sure all the code is selected and click the code ({}) button on the toolbar, or use the CTRL-K shortcut. –  Martijn Pieters May 28 '12 at 12:27
1  
You can use Counter in 2.5 and 2.6 as well. You just need this recipe. –  phihag May 28 '12 at 15:02
1  
@phihag: answer updated with a link to that, thanks. –  Martijn Pieters May 28 '12 at 15:08

To count elements, you should use a Counter:

import collections
user_counts = collections.Counter(list_of_usernames)
print(user_counts.most_common())

Alternatively, the get method of a dict does the same as setdefault, but without the side effect of storing the value in the dict:

user_to_count_map = {}
for username in list_of_usernames:
    user_to_count_map[username] = user_to_count_map.get(username, 0) + 1
share|improve this answer
    
ooh, nice one. Counters fit his usecase perfectly. –  Martijn Pieters May 28 '12 at 10:23
    
I think I oversimplified the example. As there actual value that is added for each dictonary items varies in the for loop and the calculation dependent on the original value in the map when coming into for and other things. With counter I would have to do make another counter to increase e.g. 72 values user_counts += Counter(username, 72) –  Gerard May 28 '12 at 11:59
    
@user1421439: Counter can do that for you, see my updated answer. –  Martijn Pieters May 28 '12 at 12:25

If you dislike the setdefault and always start with 0 you can do:

from collections import defaultdict

user_to_count_map = defaultdict(lambda: [0])
for username in list_of_usernames:
    # no set_default
    user_to_count_map[username][0] += value

for username, counter in sorted(user_to_count_map.items()):
    print username, counter[0]
share|improve this answer
    
Why return a default list in this case? You can just use lambda: 0 and avoid having to index. –  Martijn Pieters May 28 '12 at 15:11

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