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So I have the code:

function randomClick(interval){
        $(".thumbnail_holder .nav li:not(.empty):eq("+select+") a").trigger("click");
        window.randomTimer = setTimeout("randomClick("+interval+")", interval);
}

I need it so when a user click's ".thumbnail_holder .nav li a, it clears the interval so for example

$(".thumbnail_holder .nav li a").on("click", function(e){
    e.preventDefault();
    clearTimeout(window.randomTimer);
});

However the above code also happens on the .trigger("click");.

Is there any way the .on function can differentiate between the two?

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4  
Never pass a string to setInterval() or setTimeout(). Doing so is as bad as using eval() and it results in unreadable and possibly insecure code as soon as you use variables since you need to insert them into the string instead of passing the actual variable. The proper solution is setInterval(function() { /* your code *) }, msecs);. The same applies to setTimeout(). If you just want to call a single function without any arguments, you can also pass the function name directly: setInterval(someFunction, msecs); (note that there are no () behind the function name) –  ThiefMaster May 28 '12 at 10:41
    
@ThiefMaster - you're right (as you can see the above functions are useless and merely authored for this example, in production I do use the wrapped function method –  rickyduck May 28 '12 at 16:24
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2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

e.which will be undefined when the event is called by trigger(), but will be 1 when you left click on it.

$(".thumbnail_holder .nav li a").on("click", function(e){
    e.preventDefault();

    if (typeof e.which !== "undefined") {
        clearTimeout(window.randomTimer);
    }
});

Other option would be to pass some data when you trigger manually, and check for it in the event handler (see the extraParameters argument in trigger().

function randomClick(interval){
    $(".thumbnail_holder .nav li:not(.empty):eq("+select+") a").trigger("click", [true]);
    window.randomTimer = setTimeout("randomClick("+interval+")", interval);
}

$(".thumbnail_holder .nav li a").on("click", function(e, wasTrigger){
    e.preventDefault();

    if (!wasTrigger) {
        clearTimeout(window.randomTimer);
    }
});
share|improve this answer
    
Awesome, cheers! –  rickyduck May 28 '12 at 10:43
    
if (typeof e.which !== "undefined") { can be shortened to just if (e.which) { ... or is there some browser peculiarity I'm forgetting? –  Rory McCrossan May 28 '12 at 10:44
    
@RoryMcCrossan: Probably. I couldn't be bothered to check what 0 corresponds to in e.which ;) –  Matt May 28 '12 at 10:45
    
In fact, @Rory, you're right. jQuery normalizes e.which so that 1 is left, 2 is middle and 3 is right. –  Matt May 28 '12 at 10:47
1  
Hah! Was just reading the same page :) –  Rory McCrossan May 28 '12 at 10:48
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On a completely different tack from Matt's, you may be able to exploit a feature of .triggerHandler() - namely that it doesn't bubble, whereas a manual click (and .trigger()) do bubble.

By splitting the the click functionality into two handlers, one attached directly and the other delegated to a suitable container, you have a mechanism to execute both handlers in response to a manual click but only one in response to .triggerHandler().

$(document).on('click', 'a', function(e) {
    e.preventDefault();
    $msg2.text('Bubbled').show().fadeOut(1000);
});

$("#myLink").on('click', function(e) {
    e.preventDefault();
    $msg1.text('Direct').show().fadeOut(1000);
});

See DEMO

You will, of course, be quick to spot that this approach has its limitations. Not only do you lose the possible advantage of a single scope, but the 'Direct' event will always fire first, regardless of the order in which the attachments are made. Whereas you could take slightly messy measures to reverse the order, it would get very messy indeed to handle a need to embed the functionality of one handler inside the other. You would, in all probability, very quickly revert to Matt's approach.

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An informative approach. While blatantly not useful in this scenario where both method will have the same functionality, I could see this becoming incredibly useful under other circumstances. –  rickyduck May 28 '12 at 16:23
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