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I am measuring the duration of episodes (vector ep.dur in minutes) per day, for an observation period for T=364 days. The vector ep.dur has a length(ep.dur) of T=364, with zeros in days when no episode occurred, and range(ep.dur) is between 0 and 1440

The sum of the episode duration over the T period is a<-sum(ep.duration)

Now I have a vector den, with length(den)=99. The vector den shows how many days are required for the development of each 1% (1%, 2%, 3%, ...) of a

Now given den and a, I would like to simulate multiple ep.dur

Is this possible?

Clarification 1:: (first comment of danas.zuokas) The elements of den represent duration NOT exact days. That means, for example 1, that 1%(=1195.8) of a is developed in 1 day, 2% in 2 days, 3% in 3 days, 4% in 4 days, 5% in 5 days, 6% in 5 days .....). The episodes can take place anywhare in T

Clarification 2: (second comment of danas.zuokas) Unfortunately there can be no assumptions on how duration develops. That is why I have to simulate numerous ep.dur vectors. HOWEVER, i can expand the den vector into more finite resolution (that is: instead of 1% jumps, 0.1% jumps) if this is of any help.

Description of the algorithm The algorithm should satisfy all information the den vector provides. I have imagined the algorithm going as following (Example 3): Each 1% jump of a is 335,46 min. den[1] tells us that 1% of a is developed in 1 day. so lets say we generate ep.dur[1]=335,46. OK. We go to den[2]: 2% of the a is developed in d[2]=1 days. So, ep.dur[1] cannot be 335,46 and is rejected (2% of a should still occur in one day). Lets say that had generated ep.dur[1]=1440. d[1] is satisfied, d[2] is satisifed (at least 2% of the total duration is developed in dur[2]=1 days), dur[3]=1 is also satisfied. Keeper? However, dur[4]=2 is not satified if ep.dur[1]=1440 because it states that 4% of a (=1341) should occur in 2 days. So ep.dur[1] is rejected. Now lets say that ep.dur[1]=1200. dur[1:3] are accepted. Then we generate ep.dur[2] and so on making sure that the generated ep.dur all satisfy the information provided by den.

Is this programmatically feasible? I really do not know where to start with this problem. I will provide a generous bounty once bounty start period is over

Example 1:

a<-119508

den<-c(1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 15, 
                16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 
                30, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 40, 41, 42, 
                43, 44, 45, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 55, 
                56, 57, 58, 59, 60, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 
                70, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 80, 80, 81, 82, 
                83)

Example 2:

   a<-78624
    den<-c(1, 2, 2, 3, 3, 4, 4, 5, 5, 6, 7, 7, 8, 8, 9, 9, 10, 10, 11, 
    11, 12, 13, 13, 14, 14, 15, 15, 16, 16, 17, 18, 19, 21, 22, 23, 
    28, 32, 35, 36, 37, 38, 43, 52, 55, 59, 62, 67, 76, 82, 89, 96, 
    101, 104, 115, 120, 126, 131, 134, 139, 143, 146, 153, 160, 165, 
    180, 193, 205, 212, 214, 221, 223, 227, 230, 233, 234, 235, 237, 
    239, 250, 253, 263, 269, 274, 279, 286, 288, 296, 298, 302, 307, 
    309, 315, 320, 324, 333, 337, 342, 347, 352)

Example 3

a<-33546
den<-c(1, 1, 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 9, 12, 15, 17, 21, 25, 29, 31, 34, 37, 
42, 45, 46, 51, 52, 56, 57, 58, 59, 63, 69, 69, 71, 76, 80, 81, 
87, 93, 95, 102, 107, 108, 108, 112, 112, 118, 123, 124, 127, 
132, 132, 132, 135, 136, 137, 150, 152, 162, 166, 169, 171, 174, 
176, 178, 184, 189, 190, 193, 197, 198, 198, 201, 202, 203, 214, 
218, 219, 223, 225, 227, 238, 240, 246, 248, 251, 254, 255, 257, 
259, 260, 277, 282, 284, 285, 287, 288, 290, 294, 297, 321, 322, 
342)

Example 4

    a<-198132

den<-c(2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 12, 13, 14, 16, 17, 18, 20, 21, 23, 24, 
    25, 27, 28, 29, 31, 32, 34, 35, 36, 38, 39, 40, 42, 43, 45, 46, 
    47, 49, 50, 51, 53, 54, 56, 57, 58, 60, 61, 62, 64, 65, 67, 68, 
    69, 71, 72, 74, 75, 76, 78, 79, 80, 82, 83, 85, 86, 87, 89, 90, 
    91, 93, 94, 96, 97, 98, 100, 101, 102, 104, 105, 107, 108, 109, 
    111, 112, 113, 115, 116, 120, 123, 130, 139, 155, 165, 172, 176, 
    178, 181, 185, 190, 192, 198, 218)
share|improve this question
1  
To clarify some things: in Example 4 we have 198132/24/60=137.5917 days of total episode duration during a year. And it takes 218 calendar days to develop 99% of total episode duration. Does that mean that from day 219 to 354 no episode will occur? Or it could have started at day 354-218=136 (or other earlier day) and develop 99% of total episode duration by the end of a year (or earlier)? –  danas.zuokas May 28 '12 at 11:45
    
Thanks for the comment. Please see clarification –  ECII May 28 '12 at 12:01
1  
Are there any assumptions as of how duration develop? For Example 4, 1%=1981.32 (from 98% to 99%) of total duration should develop in 20 days. So we have infinite possible developments: 1) "dirichlet" 1981.32 in any day, 2) "uniform" 1981.32/20 in every day etc. –  danas.zuokas May 28 '12 at 12:21
    
Another great comment. Thank you very much. No, unfortunately there can be no assumptions on how duration develops. That is why I have to simulate numerous ep.dur vectors. HOWEVER, i can expand the den vector into more finite resolution (that is: instead of 1% jumps, 0.1% jumps) if this is of any help. –  ECII May 28 '12 at 13:54
    
Are you sure the vector den has a length of 99? When is the last 1% going to be completed? With simulation this extra condition would yield the last 1% to be completed on the 99% day or spread over any of the remaining days of the year –  Subs May 31 '12 at 8:58
show 1 more comment

2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted
+100

As far as I understand what you're after, I would start by converting den to an rle object. (Here using data from your Example 3)

EDIT: Add 100% at day 364 to den

if(max(den)!=364) den <- c(den, 364)
(rleDen <- rle(den))
# Run Length Encoding
#   lengths: int [1:92] 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ...    # 92 intervals
#   values : num [1:92] 1 2 4 6 8 9 12 15 17 21 ...
percDur <- rleDen$lengths            # Percentage of total duration in each interval
atDay <- rleDen$values               # What day that percentage was reached
intWidth <- diff(c(0, atDay), k = 1) # Interval width
durPerDay <- 1440                    # Max observation time per day
percPerDay <- durPerDay/a*100        # Max percentage per day
cumPercDur <- cumsum(percDur)        # Cumulative percentage in each interval
maxPerInt <- pmin(percPerDay * diff(c(0, atDay), 1),
  percDur + 1)                       # Max percent observation per interval

set.seed(1)
nsims <- 10                          # Desired number of simulations
sampMat <- matrix(0, ncol = length(percDur), nrow = nsims) # Matrix to hold sim results

To allow for randomness while considering the limitation of a maximum 1440 minutes of observation per day, check to see if there are any long intervals (i.e., any intervals in which the jump in percentage cannot be completely achieved in that interval)

if(any(percDur > maxPerInt)){
  longDays <- percDur > maxPerInt
  morePerInt <- maxPerInt - percDur
  perEnd <- c(which(diff(longDays,1) < 0), length(longDays))
# Group intervals into periods bounded by "long" days
# and determine if there are any long periods (i.e., where
# the jump in percentage can't be achieved in that period)
  perInd <- rep(seq_along(perEnd), diff(c(0, perEnd)))
  perSums <- tapply(percDur, perInd, sum)
  maxPerPer <- tapply(maxPerInt, perInd, sum)
  longPers <- perSums > maxPerPer
# If there are long periods, determine, starting with the last period, when the
# excess can be covered. Each group of periods is recorded in the persToWatch
# object
  if(any(longPers)) {
    maxLongPer <- perEnd[max(which(longPers))]
    persToWatch <- rep(NA, length(maxLongPer))
    for(kk in rev(seq_len(maxLongPer))) {
      if(kk < maxLongPer && min(persToWatch, na.rm = TRUE) <= kk) next
        theSums <- cumsum(morePerInt[order(seq_len(kk),
          decreasing = TRUE)])
        above0 <- which(rev(theSums) > 0)
        persToWatch[kk] <- max(above0[which(!perInd[above0] %in% c(perInd[kk],
          which(longPers)) & !above0 %in% which(longDays))])
    }
  }
}

Now we can start the randomness. The first component of the sampling determines the overall proportion of a that occurs in each of the intervals. How much? Let runif decide. The upper and lower limits must reflect the maximum observation time per day and the excess amount of any long days and periods

  for(jj in seq_along(percDur[-1])) {
    upperBound <- pmin(sampMat[, jj] + maxPerInt[jj],
      cumPercDur[jj] + 1)
    lowerBound <- cumPercDur[jj]
# If there are long days, determine the interval over which the
# excess observation time may be spread
    if(any(percDur > maxPerInt) && any(which(longDays) >= jj)) {
      curLongDay <- max(which(perInd %in% perInd[jj]))
      prevLongDay <- max(0, min(which(!longDays)[which(!longDays) <= jj]))
      curInt <- prevLongDay : curLongDay
# If there are also long periods, determine how much excess observation time there is
      if(any(longPers) && maxLongPer >= jj) {
        curLongPerHigh <- min(which(!is.na(persToWatch))[
          which(!is.na(persToWatch)) >= jj])
        curLongPerLow <- persToWatch[curLongPerHigh]
        longInt <- curLongPerLow : curLongPerHigh
        curExtra <- max(0,
          cumPercDur[curLongPerHigh] - 
          sum(maxPerInt[longInt[longInt > jj]]) - 
          sampMat[, jj, drop = FALSE])
      } else {
        curExtra <- cumPercDur[curLongDay] - 
          (sum(maxPerInt[curInt[curInt > jj]]) +
          sampMat[, jj, drop = FALSE])
      }
# Set the lower limit for runif appropriately
      lowerBound <- sampMat[, jj, drop = FALSE] + curExtra
    }
# There may be tolerance errors when the observations are tightly
# packed
    if(any(lowerBound - upperBound > 0)) { 
      if(all((lowerBound - upperBound) <= .Machine$double.eps*2*32)) {
        upperBound <- pmax(lowerBound, upperBound)
      } else {
        stop("\nUpper and lower bounds are on the wrong side of each other\n",
          jj,max(lowerBound - upperBound))
      }
    }
    sampMat[, jj + 1] <- runif(nsims, lowerBound, upperBound)
  }

Then add 100 percent to the end of the results and calculate the interval-specific percentage

  sampMat2 <- cbind(sampMat[, seq_along(percDur)], 100)
  sampPercDiff <- t(apply(sampMat2, 1, diff, k = 1))

The second component of the randomness determines the distribution of sampPercDiff over the interval widths intWidth. This still requires more thought in my opinion. For instance, how long does a typical episode last compared to the unit of time under consideration?

For each interval, determine if the random percentage needs to be allocated over multiple time units (in this case days). EDIT: Changed the following code to limit percentage increase when intWidth > 1.

library(foreach)
  ep.dur<-foreach(ii = seq_along(intWidth),.combine=cbind)%do%{
    if(intWidth[ii]==1){
      ret<-sampPercDiff[, ii, drop = FALSE] * a / 100
      dimnames(ret)<-list(NULL,atDay[ii])
      ret
    } else {
      theDist<-matrix(numeric(0), ncol = intWidth[ii], nrow = nsims)
      for(jj in seq_len(intWidth[ii]-1)){
        theDist[, jj] <- floor(runif(nsims, 0, pmax(0,
          min(sampPercDiff[, ii], floor(sampMat2[,ii + 1])-.Machine$double.eps -
          sampMat2[,ii]) * a / 100 - rowSums(theDist, na.rm = TRUE))))
      }
      theDist[, intWidth[ii]] <- sampPercDiff[, ii] * a / 100 - rowSums(theDist,
        na.rm = TRUE)
      distOrder <- replicate(nsims, c(sample.int(intWidth[ii] - 1),
        intWidth[ii]), simplify = FALSE)
      ret <- lapply(seq_len(nrow(theDist)), function(x) {
        theDist[x, order(distOrder[[x]])]
      })
      ans <- do.call(rbind, ret)
      dimnames(ans) <- list(NULL, atDay[ii]-((intWidth[ii]:1)-1))
      ans
    }
  }

The duration time is sampled randomly for each time unit (day) in the interval to which it is to be distributed. After breaking up the total duration into daily observed times, these are then assigned randomly to the days in the interval.


Then, multiply the sampled and distributed percentages by a and divide by 100

ep.dur[1, 1 : 6]
#         1         2         3         4         5         6 
# 1095.4475  315.4887    1.0000  578.9200   13.0000  170.6224 

ncol(ep.dur)
# [1] 364

apply(ep.dur, 1, function(x) length(which(x == 0)))
# [1] 131 133 132 117 127 116 139 124 124 129

rowSums(ep.dur)/a
# [1] 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

plot(ep.dur[1, ], type = "h", ylab = "obs time")

Even newer samp

share|improve this answer
1  
@ECII, Thank you for your reply. I forgot about the limitation of 1440. That should be feasible with more or less the above framework, but requires the upper and lower bounds of runif to be set. I'll have a closer look later. Also, I have an idea to better allow for zero days. More to come... –  BenBarnes Jun 1 '12 at 7:47
1  
@ECII, here's an update to increase the likelihood of simulating zero observation days. The 1440 limitation is giving me a bit of a headache, but it's nearly there. –  BenBarnes Jun 1 '12 at 21:41
1  
@ECII, please see the edited answer which limits observed time to the maximum time in a day. Also, subs wrote a great answer, but it doesn't look like it would allow for as much random variation as the answer above (compare the first 16 results of simulations with data from your example 2). –  BenBarnes Jun 5 '12 at 15:52
1  
@BenBarnes The known problem in my solution is defining a proper boundary for min. The min value is dictated by future values of den and as such it requires more thought and consideration. Once that tweak works, it should be fine and all errors would be based on runif command unless an user-defined random-generator could be used. I don't have much time to work on this but I will see whether I can get it fixed. –  Subs Jun 5 '12 at 16:47
1  
@ECII, well that works but I can only update end of next week. I am preparing for a conference right now which will keep me busy till Thursday next week. –  Subs Jun 7 '12 at 6:51
show 4 more comments

I would most probably do this with a ruby script but it could be done in R too. I am not sure whether it is your homework problem or not. As to answer your question: Can this be done problematically? Yes, Ofcourse!

According to your problem, my solution is to define the minimum and maximum limits with in which I could like to randomly pick a percentage that satisfies the conditions given by den vector and a value.

Since the den vector only contains 99% values, we cannot be sure when the 100% is going to happen. This condition yields my solution to be split into 3 parts - 1) For the given den vector upto 98% 2) For the 99% 3) Beyond 99%. I could define another function and put the common code in all these 3 parts in it but I haven't done so.

Since, I use runif command to generate random numbers, given the low-limit, it is unlikely that it will generate the exact low-limit value. Hence, I have defined a threshold value which I can check and if it falls below it, I would make it 0. You can have this or remove it. Also when you consider example 4, the first 1% is going to happen at 2nd day. So it means the 1st day could contain upto a maximum=0.999999% of the episode and then the 1% occurs on 2nd day. This is why the maximum limit is defined by subtracting a smallestdiff value, which can be changed.

FindMinutes=function(a,den){
  if (a>1440*364){
    Print("Invalid value for aa")
    return("Invalid value for aa")
  }
  threshold=1E-7
  smallestdiff=1E-6
  sum_perc=0.0
  start=1 #day 1
  min=0 #minimum percentage value for a day
  max=0 #maximum percentage value for a day
  days=rep(c(0),364) #day vector with percentage of minutes - initialized to 0

  maxperc=1440*100/a #maximum percentage wrto 1440 minutes/day

  #############################################################
  #############################################################
  ############ For the length of den vector ###################
  for (i in 1:length(den)){
    if (den[i]>start){   
      min=(i-1)-sum_perc
      for(j in start:(den[i]-1)){#number of days in-between
         if (j>start){ min=0 }
         if (i-smallestdiff-sum_perc>=maxperc){
           max=maxperc
           if ((i-smallestdiff-sum_perc)/(den[i]-j)>=maxperc){
              min=maxperc
           }else{
              if ((i-smallestdiff-sum_perc)/(den[i]-j-1)<maxperc){
                 min=maxperc-(i-smallestdiff-sum_perc)/(den[i]-j-1)
               }else{
                 min=maxperc
               }           
           }
         }else{     
           max=i-smallestdiff-sum_perc
         }  

         if ((r=runif(1,min,max))>=threshold){
            days[j]=r
            sum_perc=sum_perc+days[j]
         }else{
            days[j]=0.0
         }
      }
      start=den[i]
    }
  }
  #############################################################
  #############################################################
  #####################For the 99% ############################
  min=99-sum_perc
  for(j in start:den[length(den)]){
    if (j>start){
           min=0
    }
    max=100-sum_perc
    if (100-sum_perc>=maxperc){
        max=maxperc
        if ((100-sum_perc)/(364+1-j)>=maxperc){
            min=maxperc
        }else{
            if ((100-sum_perc)/(364-j)<maxperc){
               min=maxperc-(100-sum_perc)/(364-j)
            }else{
               min=maxperc
            }           
        }
    }else{
        max=100-sum_perc
    }
    if ((r=runif(1,min,max))>=threshold){
        days[j]=r
        sum_perc=sum_perc+days[j]
    }else{
        days[j]=0.0
    }
  }
  #############################################################
  #############################################################
  ##################### For the remaining 1%###################
  min=0
  for(j in den[length(den)]+1:364){
      max=100-sum_perc
      if (j==364){
        min=max
        days[j]=min      
      }else{
        if (100-sum_perc>maxperc){
           max=maxperc
           if ((100-sum_perc)/(364+1-j)>=maxperc){
              min=maxperc
           }else{
              if ((100-sum_perc)/(364-j)<maxperc){
                 min=maxperc-(100-sum_perc)/(364-j)
               }else{
                 min=maxperc
               }           
           }
        }else{
           max=100-sum_perc
        }
        if ((r=runif(1,min,max))>=threshold){
           days[j]=r
        }else{
           days[j]=0.0
        }
    }
    sum_perc=sum_perc+days[j]  
    if (sum_perc>=100.00){
       break
    }  
  }
  return(days*a/100) #return as minutes vector corresponding to each 364 days
}#function     

In my code, I randomly generate percentage values of episodes for each day according to the minimum and maximum value. Also, the condition (den vector) holds good when you round the percentage values to integers (days vector) but you might need extra tuning (which depends on checking the den vector further ahead and then re-tuning the minimum value of percentages) if you want it accurate upto few decimal places. You can also check to make sure that sum(FindMinutes(a,den)) is equal to a. If you want to define den in terms of 0.1%, you can do so but you need to change the corresponding equations (in min and max)

As the worst case scenario example, if you make a as the maximum value it can take and a corresponding den vector:

a=1440*364
den<-c(0)
cc=1
for(i in 1:363){
 if (trunc(i*1440*100/(1440*364))==cc){
  den[cc]=i
  cc=cc+1
 }
}

You can run the above example by calling the function: maxexamplemin=FindMinutes(a,den) and you can check to see that all the days have the maximum minutes of 1440 which is the only possible scenario here.

As an illustration, let me run your example 3:

a<-33546
den<-c(1, 1, 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 9, 12, 15, 17, 21, 25, 29, 31, 34, 37, 42, 45, 46, 51, 52, 56, 57, 58, 59, 63, 69, 69, 71, 76, 80, 81, 87, 93, 95, 102, 107, 108, 108, 112, 112, 118, 123, 124, 127, 132, 132, 132, 135, 136, 137, 150, 152, 162, 166, 169, 171, 174, 176, 178, 184, 189, 190, 193, 197, 198, 198, 201, 202, 203, 214, 218, 219, 223, 225, 227, 238, 240, 246, 248, 251, 254, 255, 257, 259, 260, 277, 282, 284, 285, 287, 288, 290, 294, 297, 321, 322, 342)
rmin=FindMinutes(a,den)
sum(rmin)
[1] 33546
rmin2=FindMinutes(a,den)
rmin3=FindMinutes(a,den)
plot(rmin,tpe="h")
par(new=TRUE)
plot(rmin2,col="red",type="h")
par(new=TRUE)
plot(rmin3,col="red",type="h")

and the 3 super-imposed plots is shown below : Super-imposed plots of the 3 simulations for Example 3

share|improve this answer
    
This is a great answer. +1. I'm also not completely happy with the distribution of the lower boundaries for runif in my answer. Perhaps a good solution will come to mind. –  BenBarnes Jun 5 '12 at 20:42
1  
Guess, i should taken half the bounty for the idea –  Subs Jun 5 '12 at 20:45
    
Is it possible to split the bounty? –  ECII Jun 5 '12 at 21:21
1  
While the problem with the lower limits became clear a while ago when @ECII pointed out that I had forgotten the upper limits, one thing that you addressed that I was careless about are the upper limits of <1% days, for example the maximum .999999% on day one of example 2. I'll fix that problem tomorrow, as I need sleep now. But splitting the bounty would be fine with me if it's possible. –  BenBarnes Jun 5 '12 at 23:12
    
Guys, thank you very much. Your work has helped me a lot with my problem. @BenBarnes : Will be looking forward to your update. –  ECII Jun 7 '12 at 6:45
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