Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

What is the best way to convert a eps image to a png?

share|improve this question

closed as off-topic by Brad Larson Aug 19 '13 at 17:50

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions about general computing hardware and software are off-topic for Stack Overflow unless they directly involve tools used primarily for programming. You may be able to get help on Super User." – Brad Larson
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

add comment

12 Answers

up vote 19 down vote accepted

If you want an easy user friendly way to do it without needing to know ninja-commands, GIMP ( Gnu Image Manipulation Program ) comes with ability to load eps files. I've in fact also found it the most reliable tool to do so, especially with the larger ones, some applications just die.

GIMP also comes with ability to set anti aliasing settings and you can specify the arbitrary scale you want to render the image at.

EDIT: GIMP uses GhostScript ( @Nils ) as the backend for rasterising. It just nicely abstracts the interface for you for the sake of user friendlyness. However, setting this up on windows is a little harder, ( it JustWorks(TM) on linux )

  • I can't open PS and EPS files. Am I missing something?
    • You need to install GhostScript to be able to read PostScript files with GIMP. GhostScript can be downloaded from http://pages.cs.wisc.edu/~ghost/. After you install GhostScript, set the environment variable GS_PROG to the full path to gs.exe.
share|improve this answer
    
I've found some upper limits on resolution when using GIMP 2.6.8 with some EPS files on Linux, and resorted to ImageMagick via the command line to overcome this. –  DozenCrows Jul 6 '11 at 16:26
    
Gimp user friendly? lindelofs one-liner is much better, and allows for scripting. –  user1443778 Nov 9 '12 at 1:24
1  
Many people don't like command lines, or even use command lines, and the documentation for the advanced features of ghostscript and convert are a bit overwhelming, whereas the Gimp UI simplifies this interaction for the majority of use-cases. –  Kent Fredric Nov 18 '12 at 8:10
add comment

If you have the ImageMagick package installed, you can use the convert(1) program:

convert image.eps image.png
share|improve this answer
    
Note that in some cases you'll need a colour profile so it doesn't come out wonky. –  ceejayoz Sep 20 '08 at 13:45
    
This works, but I end up using GIMP so that I can easily control the resolution of the image. –  ccook Nov 2 '10 at 12:45
2  
To tightly control resolution I've used "convert -geometry UxV -density U image.eps image.png" where U and V are the desired image dimensions in pixels. –  DozenCrows Jul 6 '11 at 16:11
    
I had to add the -flatten flag to get the background to come out right. –  Brian Hawkins Feb 23 '12 at 2:15
4  
"no decode delgate for this image format" –  Justin Love Apr 23 '12 at 19:13
show 1 more comment

I usually use (you need to have ImageMagick package installed!)

convert -density 300 sierraf.eps sierraf.png
share|improve this answer
add comment

PNG is a raster format, meaning it won't preserve vector information.

share|improve this answer
add comment

EPS files are hard to convert on your own because they're programs written in the postscript-language. To rasterize them on your own you don't only need a postscript interpreter but a full blown rasterizer-library as well.

The GNU Ghostscript package can do all that and even more for you. It can load and render these files from a command line and write them to bitmap files. It lets you choose the resolution, the color-depth and different anti-aliasing settings.

The package is easy to find on google and- there is a windows port of it as well.

To convert EPS files from a program or command line you don't need the GSview GUI-frontend btw.

share|improve this answer
add comment

inkscape

file -> export bitmap

share|improve this answer
4  
This doesn't work out of the box on Windows. :( –  Jason Pratt Feb 11 '11 at 21:06
    
works cool on ubuntu. able to export as a whole or just select relevant parts and export it easily. –  Jayy Vis Feb 3 '13 at 8:13
add comment

Try SVG instead.

Problem: Internet Explorer supports it using a discontinued Adobe plugin. Other mainstream browsers have native support.

share|improve this answer
1  
This is not a helpful suggestion when you already have an eps file that you're trying to convert, as the asker implies. –  Jason Pratt Feb 11 '11 at 21:09
add comment

You should probably specify what environment you're working in.

On the Mac, as a user, double click and it will open in Preview as a PDF. Save as, and select PNG from the popup. Or, leave it as a PDF, it's a better match than png anyway.

Programmatically, on the mac, it's more or less the same process. You use CGPSConverter to convert the EPS to PDF data, draw it in a bitmap, and save it as a png. Bindings for the required functions are available in C and python in the standard OS install.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Another way on Linux is the program potrace it converts vector graphics in bitmaps and vice versa. I often use it when ImageMagick wasn't able to convert an .eps file.

share|improve this answer
add comment

If you want to do it programmatically, or you don't shy back from writing your own converter, the Cairo library is a easy way to do such a conversion. Using the python bindings for cairo it is only a matter of a few lines to implement it yourself. In java I think it would be possible to use batik with similar success.

share|improve this answer
add comment

I usually do this the quick and dirty way: display the image on the screen, hit printscreen, then paste into a photo viewer. Then just crop the picture and save!

share|improve this answer
add comment

There we also free website that will convert EPS to PNG for you, example: http://eps2png.com

If you need a way to do it in your code ghostscript is the way to go IMO

share|improve this answer
add comment

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.