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Lets say a student enrolled in a particular course. His total fee is $25000 (base on other computations such as tuition fee, miscellaneous fees, etc.).

Now, this is what confuses me. How can I get AND compute the total remaining balance of the student. Should I:

  1. Subtract the amount he paid from his total balance(a column in my table) every time he pays.

  2. Do not ever modify any column, but use another attribute called total_fee column. Just get the total amount he paid from every transactions that can be found in my tution_payment table, and then subtract the result from the total_fee(this can be done through my query). Also please be noted that I didnt use total_balance here.

I remember someone told me that

Financial transactions are generally only inserted

Does this mean that my former solution is right? Currently, I use the latter, but feels that it is an inaccurate solution.

I am not familiar with how databases represent accounting transactions, so any help will be much appreciated.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Normally, there would be a table with transactions. The student fee would be booked as credit to the university and debit to the student. A repayment would be booked as credit to the student. An interest fee would be credit to the university.

That way, there is no need to store a balance. You calculate the balance based on the transaction history. The biggest advantage is that you can explain the balance; it's not just a number stored in a database, but it has a full history of how it came to be.

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Definitely go with a double entry accounting model. (+1) Any other approach will eventually land you in trouble, being unable to explain or justify your numbers. –  Joel Brown May 28 '12 at 15:27
    
@Andomar - You mean I didnt have to record the balance in a column? That all I need is a table for transactions that I can sum up(through a view/query), and possibly other computations, to get the total balance? –  Arman May 29 '12 at 10:35
    
@Arman: Yes, that's exactly what I was trying to say –  Andomar May 29 '12 at 11:08
    
@Andomar: Thanks! –  Arman May 29 '12 at 12:44

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