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In my current project, I am trying to make a uniform interfaces of all sensor driver.

For instance, Temperature sensor has a temperature sensor driver to get data from it.

Now, my problem is each sensor response with its own data Object. I have written following example of Temperature Sensor. How can I make sensor driver interface uniform, so programmer should only know SensorResonse (not TempSensorResponse).

public class TempSensor implements Sensor {


    /**
     * Returns a SensorInfo object that describes this sensor.
     */
    @Override
    public TempSensorInfo getSensorInfo() {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub
        return null;
    }

    /**
     * Asks the sensor for a (possibly old) datapoint. Synchronous: returns
     * immediately, even if that means returning an old value.
     */
    @Override
    public TempResponse getData() {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub
        return null;
    }

    /**
     * Asks the sensor for a new datapoint. Asynchronous.
     *
     * @param handler A Handler object to be executed when the sensor has a
     * new value. If this Sensor is event-based, this method starts listening
     * for data, and calls the handler whenever new events are detected.
     */
    @Override
    public void getData(SensorListener handler) {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub

    }

}

/** * A SensorResponse is the response that a sensor passes to its callee whenever * it is asked for some data. It carries both the sensor data itself as it does * some metadata about it, such as the SensorInfo of the sensor that produced * this response. */

public class TempResponse extends SensorResponse {


    public TempResponse(TempSensorInfo sensorInfo, TempSensorData payload) {
        super(sensorInfo, payload);
        // TODO Auto-generated constructor stub
    }

}
share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Use generics:

Make an interface/base classes.

public interface ISensor 
    <I extends ISensor.SensorInfo, 
     R extends ISensor.SensorResponse, 
     L extends ISensor.SensorListener> 
{

    /**
    * Returns a SensorInfo object that describes this sensor.
    */
    public I getSensorInfo();

    /**
    * Asks the sensor for a (possibly old) datapoint. Synchronous: returns
    * immediately, even if that means returning an old value.
    */
    public R getData();

    /**
    * Asks the sensor for a new datapoint. Asynchronous.
    * 
    * @param handler
    *            A Handler object to be executed when the sensor has a new
    *            value. If this Sensor is event-based, this method starts
    *            listening for data, and calls the handler whenever new events
    *            are detected.
    */
    public void getData(L handler);

    public static class SensorInfo { }
    public static class SensorResponse { }
    public static class SensorListener { }
}

Make your sensors implement/extend the interface/classes:

public class TemperatorSensor 
    implements ISensor 
        <TemperatorSensor.TemperatorInfo, 
         TemperatorSensor.TemperatorResponse, 
         TemperatorSensor.TemperatorListener> 
{

    @Override
    public TemperatorInfo getSensorInfo() {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub
        return null;
    }

    @Override
    public TemperatorResponse getData() {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub
        return null;
    }

    @Override
    public void getData(TemperatorListener handler) {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub
    }

    public static final class TemperatorInfo extends ISensor.SensorInfo { }
    public static final class TemperatorResponse extends ISensor.SensorResponse { }
    public static final class TemperatorListener extends ISensor.SensorListener { }
}

Without using Generics:

Base interface/classes

public interface ISensor {

    /**
     * Returns a SensorInfo object that describes this sensor.
     */
    public ISensor.SensorInfo getSensorInfo();

    /**
     * Asks the sensor for a (possibly old) datapoint. Synchronous: returns
     * immediately, even if that means returning an old value.
     */
    public ISensor.SensorResponse getData();

    /**
     * Asks the sensor for a new datapoint. Asynchronous.
     * 
     * @param handler
     *            A Handler object to be executed when the sensor has a new
     *            value. If this Sensor is event-based, this method starts
     *            listening for data, and calls the handler whenever new events
     *            are detected.
     */
    public void getData(ISensor.SensorListener handler);

    public static class SensorInfo { }
    public static class SensorResponse { }
    public static class SensorListener { }
}

Extended interface/classes

public class TemperatorSensor implements ISensor {

    @Override
    public SensorInfo getSensorInfo() {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub
        return new TemperatorInfo();
    }

    @Override
    public SensorResponse getData() {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub
        return new TemperatorResponse();
    }

    @Override
    public void getData(SensorListener handler) {
        if (handler instanceof TemperatorListener) {
            // TODO Auto-generated method stub
        }
    }

    public static final class TemperatorInfo extends ISensor.SensorInfo { }
    public static final class TemperatorResponse extends ISensor.SensorResponse { }
    public static final class TemperatorListener extends ISensor.SensorListener { }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Generics has been part of Java since 1.5 (2004) but I'll add a non generic implementation. – Justin May 28 '12 at 13:55
    
I think still the problem remains. Developers have to know that temperature sensor sends its data as temperatureResponse. My requirement is that developers should not care about this complexity. They should only know that any sensor sends data in sensorResponse (not even TempeatureResponse). – Pankesh May 28 '12 at 14:00
1  
I don't see that requirement. Developers would either call getData() on a class that extends ISensor which returns a SensorResponse or they add themselves as a listener to a class which extends ISensor where they'd get a callback of type defined in ISensor. – Justin May 28 '12 at 14:08
    
oh .. thanks lot Justin. I got your point. thanks again for your time and efforts. – Pankesh May 28 '12 at 14:13
    
No problem. Hope it helped. – Justin May 28 '12 at 14:15

You will most likely have to make a SensorResponse class hierarchy in addition to the Sensor class hierarchy. The getData() method (which should be defined in the Sensor base class) would be defined to return an instance of SensorResponse.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Brady, I have edited question with some more code. It includes SensorResponse extended by TemperatureResponse. – Pankesh May 28 '12 at 13:36

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