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I have a employee table with columns like emp_id, firstname, lastname, region_id, status and effective_date.

Employee Table can have multiple entries for same employee with different effective dates and statuses.

Employee can have two statuses 'Leaver' and 'Joiner'.

id     emp_id    firstname     region    status     effective_date  
1       1         James        Asia      Joiner     1-Jan-2012 
2       1         James        UK        Leaver     1-Aug-2012
3       1         James        USA       Joiner     1-Aug-2012
4       1         James        Asia      Leaver     1-May-2012
5       1         James        UK        Joiner     1-May-2012
6       1         James        USA       Leaver     1-Sep-2012

With the above data in employee table, If i want to get the latest record of james as on 1 Jan 2012, I would get record with id = 1,

If i want to get the latest record of james as on 1 May 2012, I would get record with id = 5

If i want to get the latest record of james as on 1 Aug 2012, I would get record with id = 3,

If i want to get the latest record of james as on 1 Sep 2012, I would get record with id = 6

Following query correctly gives me latest record

SELECT 
        emp_id, 
        MAX(effective_date) AS latest_effective_date
FROM 
        EMPLOYEE
GROUP BY 
        emp_id

But then how do I get the other columns such as firstname , region etc.

If I put them in select clause or group by clause, I dont just get the latest record but the other records as well.

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Could you explain this please? "If i want to get the latest record of james as on 1 Aug 2012, I would get record with id = 3" why not 2? –  Sebas May 28 '12 at 14:39
    
@Sebas. Sure, James is moving from region UK to USA on 1 Aug 2012. So, If I need to see where is James as on 1 Aug 2012, it has to return USA and not UK. Hence the record with id = 3 and not id = 2. –  anything May 28 '12 at 14:43
1  
well then your entire logic is to be reviewed, your own query returns "correctly last record" only by chance. I'm off this topic now, you have analytic problems to solve. –  Sebas May 28 '12 at 14:45
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7 Answers

SELECT * FROM 
( SELECT  
    e.*,
    ROW_NUMBER() OVER (partition by emp_id order by effective_date DESC) r
FROM  
    EMPLOYEE  e)
WHERE r = 1;

Above will get you a record with maximal effective__Date for every distinct emp_id.

Your second requirement of returning record for given date should be fullfiled by this query:

("status ASC" - will take care of taking "Joiner" status if there is also "Leaver" for the same date.)

 SELECT * FROM 
( SELECT  
    e.*,
    ROW_NUMBER() OVER (partition by emp_id order by effective_date DESC, status ASC) r
FROM  
    EMPLOYEE  e
WHERE effective_date <= '<your desired date>')
WHERE r=1;
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You need to inner join the query you already have back to your Employee table to limit the records:

SELECT  Emp.*
FROM    Employee Emp
        INNER JOIN
        (   SELECT  Emp_ID, MAX(effective_date) AS latest_effective_date
            FROM    Employee
            GROUP BY Emp_ID
        ) MaxEmp
            ON Emp.Emp_ID = MaxEmp.Emp_ID
            AND Emp.Effective_Date = MaxEmp.latest_effective_date
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Nopes, not working. –  anything May 28 '12 at 14:30
2  
I cannot suggest an improvement/correction based on this feedback. Why is it not working, does it not run? Does it run but not with the results you were expecting? –  GarethD May 28 '12 at 14:33
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the query you've entered doesn't necessarily return record with ids 3, 5, 6 like you stated before, because in this case:

2       1         James        Asia      Leaver     1-May-2012
3       1         James        UK        Joiner     1-May-2012

effective_date is equal for both rows and it would probably return record with id 2 and not 3.

try adding time to your table or adding time to your effective_date column, this way you'll be able to get the latest result from a user in a determined date.

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try:

SELECT *
FROM EMPLOYEE emp
INNER JOIN (SELECT max(id) AS id
        emp_id, 
        MAX(effective_date) AS latest_effective_date
FROM 
        EMPLOYEE
GROUP BY 
        emp_id) AS employee_1 on emp.id = employee_1.id
share|improve this answer
    
Ids may not be generated in sequence. Users may enter record for 1-sep-2012 in system before inserting the record for 1-Aug-2012 (i.e. forecasting). –  anything May 28 '12 at 14:25
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Why don't just do a order by id like

select * from EMPLOYEE order by id limit 1

In your case probably like

SELECT  emp_id,          
MAX(effective_date) AS latest_effective_date,
firstname,
region,
status 
FROM EMPLOYEE 
GROUP BY  emp_id,firstname,region,status 
order by id limit 1
share|improve this answer
    
I think Oracle dont have "LIMIT" –  melanke Apr 5 '13 at 20:00
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Suppose you also want the region and status. Then do this:

SELECT 
        emp_id, 
        REGION,
        STATUS
        MAX(effective_date) AS latest_effective_date
FROM 
        EMPLOYEE
GROUP BY 
        emp_id,
        REGION,
        STATUS
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Try this one

SELECT  
  MAX(id) KEEP (DENSE_RANK FIRST ORDER BY effective_date DESC) id,
  MAX(emp_id) KEEP (DENSE_RANK FIRST ORDER BY effective_date DESC) emp_id,
  MAX(firstname) KEEP (DENSE_RANK FIRST ORDER BY effective_date DESC) firstname,
  MAX(status) KEEP (DENSE_RANK FIRST ORDER BY effective_date DESC) status,
  MAX(effective_date) KEEP (DENSE_RANK FIRST ORDER BY effective_date DESC) effective_date
FROM Employee GROUP BY firstname
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