Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have hierarchy of classes:

class A{}
class B: A {}
class C:B {}

is it possible to implement method in class A and it would be inherited by derived classes B and C and so on and that method should return value of class type?

A val = A.method(); (val is A)
B val = B.method(); (val is B)
C val = C.method(); (val is C)

And I don't want use of generics in call of this method, ie:

C val = C.method<C>();

Guys, excuse me, one elaboration, this method should be static.

I don't want to use generic in method istelf, because it forces to point type that method should return, whereas method should return type of its class.

class A
    {
      Method<T>()
      {
         T result;
         return result;
      }
    }

If I have such method I can change return type:

D result = A.Method<D>();

but I wanted it to return value of type A;

share|improve this question
    
done. the language is c# –  Andrey Khataev May 28 '12 at 14:55
    
Let me as a question, what would happen if you wrote: var val = (C as A).method(); The point is, that such construct shouldn't be necessary in normal circumstances. –  Euphoric May 28 '12 at 15:00
    
so you want public B method(){} in B and public C method(){} in C and you want the method to be defined in A, right? –  Taha Paksu May 28 '12 at 15:01
    
tpaksy, yes I do –  Andrey Khataev May 28 '12 at 15:03
    
Curious, why don't you want to use the generic in the method? –  Adam Houldsworth May 28 '12 at 15:04

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

No, that is not possible.

To call the method like that it would have to be static, and static methods are not inherited.

Using B.method() to call a static method in A is the same as using A.method(). The compiler just uses the type to determine where the method is, but it's impossible for the method to know if it was called using the A or B type.

share|improve this answer

Use an extension method:

class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            B x = new B();
            x.Method();
        }
    }

    public static class Ext
    {
        public static T Method<T>(this T obj)
            where T : A,new()
        {
            return new T();
        }
    }

    public class A
    {

    }

    public class B : A
    {

    }

Or a variation thereof. Note that you must have some public member capable of creating an instance of the specified type. To expound, the compiler 'guesses' the value of the type parameter. The method is still generic, but generic syntax is nowhere to be seen when the method is called (usually).

share|improve this answer

Using some design patterns from C++ makes this easier:

class A
{
    protected virtual A method_impl() { return new A(); }
    public A method() { return method_impl(); }
}

class B : A
{
    protected override A method_impl() { return new B(); }
    public new B method() { return (B)method_impl(); }
}

class C : B
{
    protected override A method_impl() { return new C(); }
    public new C method() { return (C)method_impl(); }
}

Of course, this exact problem never arises in C++, which allows covariant return types for overrides.


Another way, using IoC pattern:

class A
{
    protected virtual void method_impl(A a) { a.initialize(); }
    public A method() { A result = new A(); method_impl(result); return result; }
}

class B : A
{
    public new B method() { B result = new B(); method_impl(result); return result; }
}

class C : B
{
    public new C method() { C result = new C(); method_impl(result); return result; }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Although B.method() returns a B instance, the return type is A so it still needs a cast: B val = (B)(B.method());. –  Guffa May 28 '12 at 15:05
    
@Guffa: Look again -- that's true of the protected method_impl, not the public method (unless called polymorphically through a base class handle). –  Ben Voigt May 28 '12 at 15:13
    
@BenVoigt: I see, there is a method in B that shadows the method in A, which is what the OP specifically asked to avoid. So, -1 because the answer doesn't answer the question. –  Guffa May 28 '12 at 15:16
    
@Guffa: Where does he ask to avoid that? He asked to inherit behavior, and the behavior in the protected virtual method is inherited. –  Ben Voigt May 28 '12 at 15:18
    
@BenVoigt: Read the question. The method is not implemented in A for the other classes, as the implementation is shadowed. –  Guffa May 28 '12 at 15:23

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.