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There is 2 levels of loop. How to jump to next time of loop of top level when something happen in the sub level of loop?

Thanks a lot!

uuu=0
for (i in 1:100)
{
    uuu=uuu+1
    j=1000
    for(eee in 1:30)
    {
        j=j-1
        if(j<990)
        {
            if j is smaller than 990 I hope start next time of i
        }
    }
}
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2  
See: next and break, but here I would rather have an inner loop like: for (j in 1000:970) {...} –  daroczig May 28 '12 at 15:22
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3 Answers

You want next. See it's help page: ?"next"

Here is a silly example:

for(i in 1:10) {
    for(j in 1:10) {
        if(i < 5 || j <5) {
            next
        } else {
            writeLines(paste("i =", i, " j=", j))
        }
    }
}

Giving:

i = 5  j= 5
i = 5  j= 6
i = 5  j= 7
i = 5  j= 8
i = 5  j= 9
i = 5  j= 10
i = 6  j= 5
i = 6  j= 6
i = 6  j= 7
i = 6  j= 8
i = 6  j= 9
i = 6  j= 10
i = 7  j= 5
i = 7  j= 6
i = 7  j= 7
....
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@flodel has the correct answer for this, which is to use break rather than next. Unfortunately, the example in that answer would give the same result whichever control flow construct was used.

I'm adding the following example just to make clear how the behavior of the two constructs differs.

## Using `break`
for (i in 1:3) {
   for (j in 3:1) {     ## j is iterated in descending order
      if ((i+j) > 4) {
         break          ## << Only line that differs
      } else {
         cat(sprintf("i=%d, j=%d\n", i, j))
      }}}
# i=1, j=3
# i=1, j=2
# i=1, j=1

## Using `next`
for (i in 1:3) {
   for (j in 3:1) {     ## j is iterated in descending order
      if ((i+j) > 4) {
         next           ## << Only line that differs
      } else {
         cat(sprintf("i=%d, j=%d\n", i, j))
      }}}
# i=1, j=3
# i=1, j=2
# i=1, j=1
# i=2, j=2   ##  << Here is where the results differ
# i=2, j=1   ##
# i=3, j=1   ##
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I think you want to use break so R will stop looping through your inner for loop, hence proceed to the next iteration of your outer for loop:

for (i in 1:10) {
   for (j in 1:10) {
      if ((i+j) > 5) {
         # stop looping over j
         break
      } else {
         # do something
         cat(sprintf("i=%d, j=%d\n", i, j))
      }
   }
}
# i=1, j=1
# i=1, j=2
# i=1, j=3
# i=1, j=4
# i=2, j=1
# i=2, j=2
# i=2, j=3
# i=3, j=1
# i=3, j=2
# i=4, j=1
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+1 - I agree that this is the correct answer to the OP's question. I've only added an answer myself b/c I hope to better highlight just how next and break differ. –  Josh O'Brien May 28 '12 at 19:23
    
Maybe just add a break indicator to break two loops –  user1421972 Jul 12 '12 at 20:45
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