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Ok, second R question in quick succession.

My data:

           Timestamp    St_01  St_02 ...
1 2008-02-08 00:00:00  26.020 25.840 ...
2 2008-02-08 00:10:00  25.985 25.790 ...
3 2008-02-08 00:20:00  25.930 25.765 ...
4 2008-02-08 00:30:00  25.925 25.730 ...
5 2008-02-08 00:40:00  25.975 25.695 ...
...

Basically normally I would use a combination of ddply and summarize to calculate ensembles (e.g. mean for every hour across the whole year).

In the case above, I would create a category, e.g. hour (e.g. strptime(data$Timestamp,"%H") -> data$hour and then use that category in ddply, like ddply(data,"hour", summarize, St_01=mean(St_01), St_02=mean(St_02)...) to average by category across each of the columns.

but here is where it gets sticky. I have more than 40 columns to deal with and I'm not prepared to type them all one by one as parameters to the summarize function. I used to write a loop in shell to generate this code but that's not how programmers solve problems is it?

So pray tell, does anyone have a better way of achieving the same result but with less keystrokes?

share|improve this question
    
Use numcolwise() – Andrie May 28 '12 at 16:27
2  
Or reshape the St variables long then use your favorite aggregation functions by, aggregate, ddply to combine by c(hour,index), where index is the variable created in the reshape. – Ari B. Friedman May 28 '12 at 16:30
    
easy points for ya :-) – Dagon Apr 24 '15 at 2:34
    
lol thanks! hahaha. faith in humanity restored. – Reuben L. Apr 24 '15 at 2:34
up vote 29 down vote accepted

You can use numcolwise() to run a summary over all numeric columns.

Here is an example using iris:

ddply(iris, .(Species), numcolwise(mean))
     Species Sepal.Length Sepal.Width Petal.Length Petal.Width
1     setosa        5.006       3.428        1.462       0.246
2 versicolor        5.936       2.770        4.260       1.326
3  virginica        6.588       2.974        5.552       2.026

Similarly, there is catcolwise() to summarise over all categorical columns.

See ?numcolwise for more help and examples.


EDIT

An alternative approach is to use reshape2 (proposed by @gsk3). This has more keystrokes in this example, but gives you enormous flexibility:

library(reshape2)

miris <- melt(iris, id.vars="Species")
x <- ddply(miris, .(Species, variable), summarize, mean=mean(value))

dcast(x, Species~variable, value.var="mean")
     Species Sepal.Length Sepal.Width Petal.Length Petal.Width
1     setosa        5.006       3.428        1.462       0.246
2 versicolor        5.936       2.770        4.260       1.326
3  virginica        6.588       2.974        5.552       2.026
share|improve this answer
    
looks good! thanks! – Reuben L. May 28 '12 at 16:32
    
one thing. how does it work with summarize? cos i need to summarize categorically within each column too. – Reuben L. May 28 '12 at 16:35
1  
I'm not sure what you mean. Using colwise or family usually means you don't need to use summarize. Can you please expand on your question? – Andrie May 28 '12 at 16:36
    
oh yar you are right. sorry, i'm being dumb. – Reuben L. May 28 '12 at 16:38
    
@R-L it's either-or, two different approaches. Both have their merits. The melt one is neat if you're going to do a large amount of statistical calculations on each column, and want to peek at intermediate results. – smci Mar 31 '14 at 22:41

You can even simplify the second approach proposed by Andrie by omitting the ddply call completely. Just specify mean as the aggregation function in the dcast call:

library(reshape2)
miris <- melt(iris, id.vars="Species")
dcast(miris, Species ~ variable, mean)

     Species Sepal.Length Sepal.Width Petal.Length Petal.Width
1     setosa        5.006       3.428        1.462       0.246
2 versicolor        5.936       2.770        4.260       1.326
3  virginica        6.588       2.974        5.552       2.026

The same result can also be calculated very fast using the data.table package. The .SD variable in the j expression is a special data.table variable containing the subset of data for each group, excluding all columns used in by.

library(data.table)
dt_iris <- as.data.table(iris)
dt_iris[, lapply(.SD, mean), by = Species]

     Species Sepal.Length Sepal.Width Petal.Length Petal.Width
1:     setosa        5.006       3.428        1.462       0.246
2: versicolor        5.936       2.770        4.260       1.326
3:  virginica        6.588       2.974        5.552       2.026

Yet another option would be the new version 0.2 of Hadley's dplyr package

library(dplyr)
group_by(iris, Species) %>% summarise_each(funs(mean))

Source: local data frame [3 x 5]

     Species Sepal.Length Sepal.Width Petal.Length Petal.Width
1     setosa        5.006       3.428        1.462       0.246
2 versicolor        5.936       2.770        4.260       1.326
3  virginica        6.588       2.974        5.552       2.026
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