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The noexcept keyword can be appropriately applied to many function signatures, but I am unsure as to when I should consider using it in practice. Based on what I have read so far, the last-minute addition of noexcept seems to address some important issues that arise when move constructors throw. However, I am still unable to provide satisfactory answers some practical questions that led me to read more about noexcept in the first place.

  1. There are many examples of functions that I know will never throw, but for which the compiler cannot determine so on its own. Should I append noexcept to the function declaration in all such cases?

    Having to think about whether or not I need to append noexcept after every function declaration would greatly reduce programmer productivity (and frankly, would be a pain in the ass). For which situations should I be more careful about the use of noexcept, and for which situations can I get away with the implied noexcept(false)?

  2. When can I realistically expect to observe a performance improvement after using noexcept? In particular, give an example of code for which a C++ compiler is able to generate better machine code after the addition of noexcept.

    Personally, I care about noexcept because of the increased freedom provided to the compiler to safely apply certain kinds of optimizations. Do modern compilers take advantage of noexcept in this way? If not, can I expect some of them to do so in the near future?

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Code that uses move_if_nothrow (or whatchamacallit) will see a performance improvement if there's a noexcept move ctor. –  R. Martinho Fernandes May 28 '12 at 16:32

6 Answers 6

up vote 50 down vote accepted

I think it is too early to give a "best practices" answer for this as there hasn't been enough time to use it in practice. If this was asked about throw specifiers right after they came out then the answers would be very different to now.

Having to think about whether or not I need to append noexcept after every function declaration would greatly reduce programmer productivity (and frankly, would be a pain in the ass).

Well then use it when it's obvious that the function will never throw.

When can I realistically expect to observe a performance improvement after using noexcept? [...] Personally, I care about noexcept because the of increased freedom provided to the compiler to safely apply certain kinds of optimizations.

It seems like the biggest optimization gains are from user optimizations, not compiler ones due to possibility of checking noexcept and overloading on it. Most compilers follow a no-penalty-if-you-don't-throw exception handling method so I doubt it would change much (or anything) on the machine code level of your code, although perhaps reduce the binary size by removing the handling code.

Using noexcept in the big 4 (constructors, assignment, not destructors as they'll already noexcept) will likely cause the best improvements as noexcept checks are 'common' in template code such as in std containers. For instance, std::vector won't use your class's move unless it's marked noexcept (or the compiler can deduce it otherwise).

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I think the std::terminate trick still obeys the Zero-Cost model. That is, it just so happens that the range of instructions within the noexcept functions is mapped to call std::terminate if throw is used instead of the stack unwinder. I therefore doubt it has more overhead that regular exception tracking. –  Matthieu M. May 28 '12 at 17:27
    
"For instance, std::vector won't use your class's move unless it's marked noexcept." What? Really? Are you sure it is required? –  Klaim May 29 '12 at 8:40
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@Klaim See this: stackoverflow.com/a/10128180/964135 Actually it just has to be non-throwing, but the noexcept guarantees this. –  Pubby May 29 '12 at 8:52
    
@Pubby Ok thanks for the clarification, that's quite an interesting subtlety. That explains why my code still does moves. –  Klaim May 29 '12 at 8:54
    
"If a noexcept function throws then std::terminate is called which seems like it would involve a small amount of overhead"… No, this should be implemented by not generating exception tables for such a function, which the exception dispatcher should catch and then bail out. –  Potatoswatter May 29 '12 at 8:55

As I keep repeating these days: semantics first.

Adding noexcept, noexcept(true) and noexcept(false) is first and foremost about semantics. It only incidentally condition a number of possible optimizations.

As a programmer reading code, the presence of noexcept is akin to that of const: it helps me better grok what may or may not happen. Therefore, it is worthwhile spending some time thinking about whether or not you know if the function will throw. For reminder, any kind of dynamic memory allocation may throw.


Okay, now on to the possible optimizations.

The most obvious optimizations are actually performed in the libraries. C++11 provides a number of traits that allows knowing whether a function is noexcept or not, and the Standard Library implementation themselves will use those traits to favor noexcept operations on the user-defined they manipulate if possible. Such as move semantics.

The compiler may only shave a bit of fat (perhaps) from the exception handling data, because it has to take into account the fact that you may have lied. If a function marked noexcept does throw, then std::terminate is called.

If you want my opinion: this is stupid. It would have been much better to require that noexcept functions be only composed of noexcept functions, but this was chosen so that you can start using the keyword even if you use old libraries that are not noexcept-correct. Backward compatibility bites, once again.

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Maybe I'm naive, but I would imagine a function that invokes only noexcept functions wouldn't need to do anything special, because any exceptions that might arise trigger terminate before they get to this level. This differs greatly from having to deal with and propagate a bad_alloc exception. –  Hurkyl May 28 '12 at 17:56
    
@Hurkyl: you are right. Which is why a sufficiently smart compiler might figure this out and avoid generating entries in the program-counter/exception-handler table for this function (thus reducing the fat as I said). However many functions will not be marked noexcept (think about system calls for example, or low-level OS-specific C functions), which is why the short-cut chosen was that the compiler did not have to check it. –  Matthieu M. May 28 '12 at 18:20
    
Yes, it is possible to define noexcept in way as you suggest, but that would be a really unusable feature. Many function can throw if certain conditions aren't hold, and you couldn't call them even if you know the conditions are met. For example any function which may throw std::invalid_argument. –  tr3w Apr 24 '13 at 10:51
    
@tr3w: I understand your argument, however I will oppose real-world practice => it's so easy to misunderstand the requirement and have the function throw that it should not be allowed to be in a noexcept function (without proper try/catch at least). And even if now it works, any number of refactoring/maintenance may invalidate this later on. That's the biggest advantage of compile-time checks: they are exhaustive and hold version after version. –  Matthieu M. Apr 24 '13 at 12:10
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@Mordachai: Thanks! –  Matthieu M. Apr 24 '13 at 13:59

This actually does make a (potentially) huge difference to the optimizer in the compiler. Compilers have actually had this feature for years via the empty throw() statement after a function definition, as well as propriety extensions. I can assure you that modern compilers do take advantage of this knowledge to generate better code.

Almost every optimization in the compiler uses something called a "flow graph" of a function to reason about what is legal. A flow graph consists of what are generally called "blocks" of the function (areas of code that have a single entrance and a single exit) and edges between the blocks to indicate where flow can jump to. Noexcept alters the flow graph.

You asked for a specific example. Consider this code:

void foo(int x) {
    try {
        bar();
        x = 5;
        // other stuff which doesn't modify x, but might throw
    } catch(...) {
        // don't modify x
    }

    baz(x); // or other statement using x
}

The flow graph for this function is different if bar is labelled noexcept (there is no way for execution to jump between the end of bar and the catch statement). When labelled as noexcept, the compiler is certain the value of x is 5 during the baz function - the x=5 block is said to "dominate" the baz(x) block without the edge from bar() to the catch statement. It can then do something called "constant propagation" to generate more efficient code. Here if baz is inlined, the statements using x might also contain constants and then what used to be a runtime evaluation can be turned into a compile time evaluation, etc.

Anyway, short answer: noexcept lets the compiler generate a tighter flow graph, and the flow graph is used to reason about all sorts of common compiler optimizations. To a compiler, user annotations of this nature are awesome. The compiler will try to figure this stuff out, but it usually can't (the function in question might be in another object file not visible to the compiler or transitively use some function which is not visible), or when it does there is some trivial exception which might be thrown that you're not even aware of so it can't implicitly label it as noexcept (allocating memory might throw bad_alloc, for example).

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Does this actually make a difference in practice? The example is contrived because nothing before x = 5 can throw. If that part of the try block served any purpose the reasoning wouldn't hold. –  Potatoswatter May 29 '12 at 8:59
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I'd say it does make a real difference in optimizing functions which contain try/catch blocks. The example I gave although contrived, isn't exhaustive. The larger point is that noexcept (like the throw() statement before it) helps the compile generate a smaller flow graph (less edges, less blocks) which is a fundamental part of many optimizations it then does. –  Terry Mahaffey May 29 '12 at 16:53

noexcept can dramatically improve performance of some operations. This does not happen at the level of generating machine code by the compiler, but by selecting the most effective algorithm: as others mentioned, you do this selection using function std::move_if_noexcept. For instance, the growth of std::vector (e.g., when we call reserve) must provide a strong exception-safety guarantee. If it knows that T's move constructor doesn't throw, it can just move every element. Otherwise it must copy all Ts. This has been described in detail in this post.

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When can I realistically except to observe a performance improvement after using noexcept? In particular, give an example of code for which a C++ compiler is able to generate better machine code after the addition of noexcept.

Um, never? Is never a time? Never.

noexcept is for compiler performance optimizations in the same way that const is for compiler performance optimizations. That is, almost never.

noexcept is primarily used to allow "you" to detect at compile-time if a function can throw an exception. Remember: most compilers don't emit special code for exceptions unless it actually throws something. So noexcept is not a matter of giving the compiler hints about how to optimize a function so much as giving you hints about how to use a function.

Templates like move_if_noexcept will detect if the move constructor is defined with noexcept and will return a const& instead of a && of the type if it is not. It's a way of saying to move if it is very safe to do so.

In general, you should use noexcept when you think it will actually be useful to do so. Some code will take different paths if is_nothrow_constructible is true for that type. If you're using code that will do that, then feel free to noexcept appropriate constructors.

In short: use it for move constructors and similar constructs, but don't feel like you have to go nuts with it.

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Strictly, move_if_noexcept won't return a copy, it will return a const lvalue-reference rather than an rvalue-reference. In general that will cause the caller to make a copy instead of a move, but move_if_noexcept isn't doing the copy. Otherwise, great explanation. –  Jonathan Wakely May 28 '12 at 17:19
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+1 Jonathan. Resizing a vector, for example, will move the objects instead of copying them if the move constructor is noexcept. So that "never" is not true. –  mfontanini May 28 '12 at 17:23
    
@mfontanini: That's not a compiler optimization though, which is what he was asking about. –  Nicol Bolas May 28 '12 at 17:24
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I mean, the compiler will generate better code in that situation. OP is asking for an example for which the compiler is able to generate a more optimized application. This seems to be the case(even though it's not a compiler optimization). –  mfontanini May 28 '12 at 17:35
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@mfontanini: The compiler only generates better code because the compiler is forced to compile a different codepath. It only works because std::vector is written to force the compiler to compile different code. It's not about the compiler detecting something; it's about user code detecting something. –  Nicol Bolas May 28 '12 at 18:00

There are many examples of functions that I know will never throw, but for which the compiler cannot determine so on its own. Should I append noexcept to the function declaration in all such cases?

When you say "I know [they] will never throw", you mean by examining the implementation of the function you know that the function will not throw. I think that approach is inside out.

It is better to consider whether a function may throw exceptions to be part of the design of the function: as important as the argument list and whether a method is a mutator (... const). Declaring that "this function never throws exceptions" is a constraint on the implementation. Omitting it does not mean the function might throw exceptions; it means that the current version of the function and all future versions may throw exceptions. It is a constraint that makes the implementation harder. But some methods must have the constraint to be practically useful; most importantly, so they can be called from destructors, but also for implementation of "roll-back" code in methods that provide the strong exception guarantee.

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