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Using Java I am trying to initialise member variables at declaring, but for some reason the variables stay at their default values e.g. 0, null etc.

Please see a snippet of example code which demonstrates what I'm trying to accomplish:

public class B extends A {

Map<Integer, Integer> map = new HashMap <Integer, Integer>();
int number = 10;

public B() {
  super();
}

public Map getMap() {
  return map;
}

public int getNumber() {
  return number;
}

}

The important part of the code are that it is a subclass, and that I'm trying to initialise two member variables at declaration. When I step into the constructor the values of the map and number are null and 0 respectively, what is the reason for this?

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2  
IMO snippets should be cut-and-paste, which this clearly isn't--that makes diagnosing issues more difficult than it needs to be. –  Dave Newton May 28 '12 at 16:35
    
Do you have the same members in your Aclass? –  juergen d May 28 '12 at 16:35
    
It's impossible to say at the moment. Please provide a short but complete program which demonstrates the problem. –  Jon Skeet May 28 '12 at 16:35
    
(And... are they null after the call to super()? This is really the only important question you should answer. Oh, as per JohnB's answer. –  Dave Newton May 28 '12 at 16:40
2  
@LDM91 Nobody's asking for the complete code--rather an SSCCE. I find it impossible to believe they're not initialized after the ctor unless your JDK/JVM is completely broken, which I think unlikely. The code, corrected, as posted, initializes the properties as you would expect, when they should be initialized. Printing the values after super() prints 10 and an empty map. –  Dave Newton May 28 '12 at 16:44

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

By spec, the constructor of the base class is executed before initializing the members of class B.

See also here: Java Constructor and Field Initialization Order

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My guess is here is what is happening:

    class A {
        protected Map<Integer,Integer> map;
        protected int number;

        public A() {
            map=new Map() {{ //This is just initializing the map
                put(1,1);
            }}
            number=5;
        }
    }

    public class B extends A {

        Map<Integer, Integer> map = new HashMap <Integer, Integer>();
        int number = 10;

        public B() {
          super();
        }
    }

Here's what happens in the the B constructor, from the compiler's point of view:

  1. Go to the no-param constructor for A.
  2. Make a new Map called map.
  3. Make a new int called number.
  4. Initialize map with value 1 at key 1.
  5. Initialize number to 5.
  6. Done here, go to the rest of B's constructor.
  7. Make a new Map called map. This will override the variable called map constructed in A.
  8. Make a new int called number. This will override the variable called number constructed in A.
  9. (Don't initialize map.)
  10. (Don't initialize number.)
  11. Done.

I hope this clears things up. If you don't want that to happen, initialize B's fields in its own constructor.

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That would not explain the behavior OP claimed they were seeing, which is that map was null and number was 0. –  Dave Newton May 28 '12 at 17:24
    
As I clarified in my comments the member variables in the subclass had unique names which did not match anything in the super class. When I was stepping through the program, it would go into the constructor and call super() without going up to the member variables and initializing them first. I haven't been able to re-create it, but I suspect that it was perhaps a syntactical error (most likely too many or too few braces as when I commented out the majority of the class I was able to get it working). –  LDM91 May 28 '12 at 21:05

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