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I had this problem a couple of months before and now it is time to get back to it.

I query the phone's calllog into a database, but it takes around 30 seconds to populate the table. It looks like querying takes around 1 sec, but the population takes forever, although the phone stores only the last 500 calls. Why is it so slow? Am I doing something wrong?

I test it only on my phone, since I have only 8 items in the emulator's calllog.

  final String[] projection = null;

            HotOrNot infoA = new HotOrNot(Charts.this);
            infoA.open();
            infoA.createtable_Calls();
            infoA.deleteAllEntries_Calls();
            infoA.close();

            final Context context = getApplicationContext();
            final String selection = null;
            final String sortOrder = android.provider.CallLog.Calls.DATE + " DESC";

            Cursor c = context.getContentResolver().query(android.provider.CallLog.Calls.CONTENT_URI, projection, selection, null, sortOrder);
            while (c.moveToNext()) { 
                String callLogID = c.getString(c.getColumnIndex(android.provider.CallLog.Calls._ID));

                int numberColumn = c.getColumnIndex(android.provider.CallLog.Calls.NUMBER);
                int dateColumn = c.getColumnIndex(android.provider.CallLog.Calls.DATE);
                int typeColumn = c.getColumnIndex(android.provider.CallLog.Calls.TYPE);
                int durationColumn = c.getColumnIndex(android.provider.CallLog.Calls.DURATION);
                int person = c.getColumnIndex(android.provider.CallLog.Calls.CACHED_NAME);



                String number = c.getString(numberColumn);
                int duration = c.getInt(durationColumn);
                String personname = c.getString(person);
                long callDate = c.getLong(dateColumn);
                int callType = c.getInt(typeColumn);

                if (duration >= 0)
                {
                    switch (callType) {
                    case 1:
                        duration_in = duration;
                        duration_out = 0;
                        break;
                    case 2:
                        duration_out = duration;
                        duration_in = 0;
                        break;
                    case 3:
                        duration_in = 0;
                        duration_out = 0;
                        break;


                    }
                    }

    //Here comes the slow part

                    HotOrNot info = new HotOrNot(Charts.this);
                    info.open();
                    info.pop   
ulate_Calls(personname, number, String.valueOf(callType), Integer.toString(duration), Long.toString(callDate), callLogID);
                info.close();   
             }

This is the populating function:

public long populate_Calls(String name, String phone, String type, String duration, String date, String contactid) {
        ContentValues cv = new ContentValues();
        cv.put(KEY_NAME, name);
        cv.put(KEY_PHONE, phone);
        cv.put(KEY_TYPE, type);
        cv.put(KEY_DURATION, duration);
        cv.put(KEY_DATE, date);
        cv.put(KEY_CONTACTID, contactid);
        return ourDatabase.insert(DATABASE_TABLE, null, cv);        
    }

EDIT:

To Andreas Ka's and twaddington's answers I modified the population method in the SQLiteOpenHelper class, but unfortunately it did not make a difference:

public long populate_Calls(String name, String phone, String type, String duration, String date, String contactid) {
    ContentValues cv = new ContentValues();
     try {
         ourDatabase.beginTransaction();

         cv.put(KEY_NAME, name);
         cv.put(KEY_PHONE, phone);
         cv.put(KEY_TYPE, type);
         cv.put(KEY_DURATION, duration);
         cv.put(KEY_DATE, date);
         cv.put(KEY_CONTACTID, contactid);

         ourDatabase.yieldIfContendedSafely();

         ourDatabase.setTransactionSuccessful();
     } finally {
         ourDatabase.endTransaction();
     }

    return ourDatabase.insert(DATABASE_TABLE, null, cv);        
}

EDIT2: Posting the whole code based on Babibu and twaddington's answers. By the way the temp_ arrays are now LinkedLists, but that does not make a difference in time.

 final String[] projection = null;
        final Context context = getApplicationContext();
        final String selection = null;
        final String sortOrder = android.provider.CallLog.Calls.DATE + " DESC";
        lv1 = (ListView) findViewById(R.id.ListView02); 


        HotOrNot infoA = new HotOrNot(Calllogs.this);
        infoA.open();
        infoA.createtable_Calls();
        infoA.deleteAllEntries_Calls();
        infoA.close();

          pd = ProgressDialog.show(Calllogs.this, "Please wait..", "Loading data, it may take a few" +
                " seconds based on the number of data.", false, true);

        Cursor c = context.getContentResolver().query(android.provider.CallLog.Calls.CONTENT_URI, projection, selection, null, sortOrder);
        while (c.moveToNext()) { 
            String callLogID = c.getString(c.getColumnIndex(android.provider.CallLog.Calls._ID));

            int numberColumn = c.getColumnIndex(android.provider.CallLog.Calls.NUMBER);
            int dateColumn = c.getColumnIndex(android.provider.CallLog.Calls.DATE);
            int typeColumn = c.getColumnIndex(android.provider.CallLog.Calls.TYPE);
            int durationColumn = c.getColumnIndex(android.provider.CallLog.Calls.DURATION);
            int person = c.getColumnIndex(android.provider.CallLog.Calls.CACHED_NAME);



            String number = c.getString(numberColumn);
            int duration = c.getInt(durationColumn);
            String personname = c.getString(person);
            long callDate = c.getLong(dateColumn);
            int callType = c.getInt(typeColumn);

            if (duration >= 0)
            {
                switch (callType) {
                case 1:
                    duration_in = duration;
                    duration_out = 0;
                    break;
                case 2:
                    duration_out = duration;
                    duration_in = 0;
                    break;
                case 3:
                    duration_in = 0;
                    duration_out = 0;
                    break;
                }
            }

            temp_name.add(personname);
            temp_num.add(number);
            temp_type.add(String.valueOf(callType));
            temp_dur.add(Integer.toString(duration));
            temp_date.add(String.valueOf(callDate));
            temp_id.add(callLogID);
          } //end of while loop


        HotOrNot infotemp = new HotOrNot(Calllogs.this);
        infotemp.open();


            for (int i=0; i<temp_name.size(); i++)
            {
                infotemp.populate_Calls(temp_name.get(i), temp_num.get(i), temp_type.get(i), temp_dur.get(i), temp_date.get(i), temp_type.get(i));
            }
 infotemp.close();

SOLUTION

I am posting twaddington's solution, which reduced the time from 8 seconds to less than 2:

 HotOrNot infotemp = new HotOrNot(Calllogs.this);
        infotemp.open();

        // Get our database. You can do this however you wish, but
        // it seems like since the database is contained in your `HotOrNot`
        // object, it would be best to simply add a getter method to
        // the class.
        SQLiteDatabase db = infotemp.getDatabase();

        try {
            // Begin our transaction
            db.beginTransaction();

            // Loop over the array of calls and
            // perform a db insert for each.
            for (int i=0; i<temp_name.size(); i++) {
                // Yield the database lock if requested. This will
                // temporarily suspend our loop, but it should
                // continue when the lock is opened.
                db.yieldIfContendedSafely();

                infotemp.populate_Calls(temp_name.get(i), temp_num.get(i),
                        temp_type.get(i), temp_dur.get(i), temp_date.get(i), temp_type.get(i));
            }

            // Mark our transaction as successful!
            db.setTransactionSuccessful();
        } finally {
            // Always end the transaction!
            db.endTransaction();
        }

        infotemp.close();
share|improve this question
1  
Use Traceview to determine the exact source of your difficulty. –  CommonsWare May 28 '12 at 16:43
    
Please calculate for me the next times: 'c.moveToNext()', the entire while loop time,'infotemp.open()', 'infotemp.populate_Calls', the entire for loop time –  Ilya_Gazman May 29 '12 at 19:04
    
Thanks for including the updated code! –  twaddington May 29 '12 at 20:41
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

For each change that you make to the SQLite database a series of complicated steps occur, including the creation of a journal file to rollback the change if an error occurs. You can wrap your series of updates in a database transaction to force SQLite to treat the entire series as a single operation. This will be much more efficient.

try {
    db.beginTransaction();
    while (c.moveToNext()) {
        // Yield the database lock if requested
        db.yieldIfContendedSafely();

        // Add your code here!
        // ...

        // Perform the database insert
        populate_Calls(...);
    }
    db.setTransactionSuccessful();
} finally {
    db.endTransaction();
}
share|improve this answer
    
I edited my main post. Would you check if I did anything wrong? I read everywhere that this accelerates the insert, but in my case it did not –  erdomester May 28 '12 at 19:46
    
You need to put the transaction outside of the loop that calls into your populate method. The way you have it now, it is not doing anything different, it's still doing a single transaction for each insert. What you want is a single transaction for all of the inserts. If you examine the example I posted above, you'll see the transaction starts and ends outside of the loop. –  twaddington May 28 '12 at 20:48
    
I am not sure I understand you. I understand the logic (one transcation instead of many) but I don't know how to change my code. –  erdomester May 28 '12 at 21:13
    
In your example you have a loop starting with while (c.moveToNext()) (line 14 or so). For each iteration of that loop, you are invoking the method populate_Calls, which does an insert for each row. You've added the transaction code to the populate_Calls method, but it needs to be moved outside of the while loop (line 14) like I have in my example. Your populate_Calls method does not necessarily need to change from what you posted originally. –  twaddington May 29 '12 at 0:25
    
This is what Babibu suggested. In the loop I populate arrays, and after the loop I populate the table in a for loop. –  erdomester May 29 '12 at 9:10
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Try to use a single transaction for the whole method: http://notes.theorbis.net/2010/02/batch-insert-to-sqlite-on-android.html

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You are inserting while browsing, this makes locks on your database. You need first finish your while loop and and only then insert it in your database. Just keep the data in same temporary linked List(better then array in your case, coz it got fast inserts)

share|improve this answer
    
He's reading and writing from different databases. You're right that this is generally a bad idea, but I don't think it's causing any issues here. Rather, the primary issue is that he needs to wrap his inserts in a transaction. –  twaddington May 28 '12 at 18:25
    
@twaddington those times are impossible he got some lock for sure. And transaction can cost that much... I would suggest splitting it any way, even if it just for focusing the problem. Who knows may be it's an android bug... –  Ilya_Gazman May 28 '12 at 18:38
1  
I am using one database and one table. I tried this, and it reduced the time from 28 seconds to 7 seconds! –  erdomester May 28 '12 at 19:27
    
@erdomester congrats –  Ilya_Gazman May 28 '12 at 20:14
    
Glad that helped, Babibu is right, it's generally not a good idea to intermix reads and writes. It generally leads to strange problems. If you update your code to use a proper transaction I would imagine you could get it down from 7 seconds to more like 1 second. –  twaddington May 28 '12 at 20:50
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