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Could someone explain to me why the show function on string is not id function? For example

show (show 42) will return "\"42\"" what is weird and for me not intitutive.

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And wait till you try show (show (show 42)) :P –  Andres F. May 28 '12 at 16:57
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2 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

show isn't very useful if it just converts something into an arbitrary string (like toString in Java). It is much more useful if the result is both easy to read and machine-readable, so a common use of show is to produce a serialized representation of the value that you are showing, so that you can read it in again using read, and also, for most implementations of show, so that you can type the string that is shown at a Haskell REPL like ghci and get the deserialized value back.

So, if you have a string like "42", and show it, you want to get the string "\"42\"", because when you type 42 in ghci (and equivalently using the read function), you get a number, while when you type "42" in ghci, you get the string that you want.

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show has exactly the purpose of converting values to Strings. Likewise the purpose of read is to convert Strings to values. These are stated in the Haskell Report. There is no obligation whatsoever to roundtrip. Certainly round tripping has strong merit, but it is not the purpose of Show / Read and an implementation of Show could favour say "legibility" instead. –  stephen tetley May 28 '12 at 19:51
    
Hmm, I guess that you're right, I'll alter the answer accordingly. –  dflemstr May 28 '12 at 20:03
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Because read is the inverse of show. So I should always be able to read the result of show, and get back a String.

> (read "42")::String
"*** Exception: Prelude.read: no parse
> (read "\"42\"")::String
"42"
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This doesn't really answer the question though -- why doesn't read "42" :: String give "42"? (Not actually asking, but this was the unanswered question in your response) –  luqui May 28 '12 at 18:58
    
I'd say same reason let foo = bar at the ghci prompt doesn't result in assigning the literal string "bar" to foo –  gcbenison May 28 '12 at 20:22
    
you seem to be assuming some things about read which are not obvious. –  luqui May 28 '12 at 21:39
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The Haskell 2010 Report backs this up, sort of. "readsPrec should be able to parse the string produced by showsPrec, and should deliver the value that showsPrec started with." ~ Derived instances of Read and Show. At the end of the day, the answer is simply "because that's what they decided in the Haskell Report". –  Dan Burton May 29 '12 at 5:07
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