Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I currently creating a small HTTP server that returns a static page ("<p>Hello!</p>")... I tried with sockets with java:

  public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {

        // création de la socket
        int port = 1989;
        ServerSocket serverSocket = new ServerSocket(port);
        System.err.println("Serveur lancé sur le port : " + port);

        // repeatedly wait for connections, and process
        while (true) {

            // on reste bloqué sur l'attente d'une demande client
            Socket clientSocket = serverSocket.accept();
            System.err.println("Nouveau client connecté");

            // on ouvre un flux de converation

           BufferedReader in = new BufferedReader(
                           new InputStreamReader(clientSocket.getInputStream())
                          ); 
            PrintWriter out = new PrintWriter(
                         new BufferedWriter(
                            new OutputStreamWriter(clientSocket.getOutputStream())), 
                         true);   

            // chaque fois qu'une donnée est lue sur le réseau on la renvoi sur le flux d'écriture.
            // la donnée lue est donc retournée exactement au même client.
            String s;
            while ((s = in.readLine()) != null) {
                System.out.println(s);


       out.write("HTTP/1.0 200 OK\r\n");
       out.write("Date: Fri, 31 Dec 1999 23:59:59 GMT\r\n");
       out.write("Server: Apache/0.8.4\r\n");
       out.write("Content-Type: text/html\r\n");
       out.write("Content-Length: 59\r\n");
       out.write("Expires: Sat, 01 Jan 2000 00:59:59 GMT\r\n");
       out.write("Last-modified: Fri, 09 Aug 1996 14:21:40 GMT\r\n");
       out.write("\r\n");
       out.write("<TITLE>Exemple</TITLE>");
       out.write("<P>Ceci est une page d'exemple.</P>");
  }

            // on ferme les flux.
            System.err.println("Connexion avec le client terminée");
            out.close();
            in.close();
            clientSocket.close();
        }
    }

this code does not contain any errors and I got a response from the browser like this:

GET / HTTP/1.1
Host: localhost:1989
Connection: keep-alive
User-Agent: Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 6.1; WOW64) AppleWebKit/536.5 (KHTML, like Gecko) Chrome/19.0.1084.46 Safari/536.5 Comodo_Dragon/19.0.3.0
Accept: text/html,application/xhtml+xml,application/xml;q=0.9,*/*;q=0.8
Accept-Encoding: gzip,deflate,sdch
Accept-Language: fr-FR,fr;q=0.8,en-US;q=0.6,en;q=0.4
Accept-Charset: ISO-8859-1,utf-8;q=0.7,*;q=0.3

But my problem is that I get no page at the Browser? Any helps please?

PS: I already read this article: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hypertext_Transfer_Protocol , (im sorry for the french language...)

share|improve this question
add comment

4 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

In addition to the \r\n after every request header line, you have to send an empty line after the header. Example:

out.write("HTTP/1.0 200 OK\r\n");
// Header...
out.write("Last-modified: Fri, 09 Aug 1996 14:21:40 GMT\r\n");
out.write("\r\n"); // The content starts afters this empty line
out.write("<TITLE>Hello!</TITLE>");
// Content...

I corrected your code so that it works (but it is still not perfect, you should handle every request in a seperate thread, e.g. with java.util.concurrent.ThreadPoolExecutor):

public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
    // création de la socket
    int port = 1989;
    ServerSocket serverSocket = new ServerSocket(port);
    System.err.println("Serveur lancé sur le port : " + port);

    // repeatedly wait for connections, and process
    while (true) {
        // on reste bloqué sur l'attente d'une demande client
        Socket clientSocket = serverSocket.accept();
        System.err.println("Nouveau client connecté");

        // on ouvre un flux de converation

        BufferedReader in = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(clientSocket.getInputStream()));
        BufferedWriter out = new BufferedWriter(new OutputStreamWriter(clientSocket.getOutputStream()));

        // chaque fois qu'une donnée est lue sur le réseau on la renvoi sur
        // le flux d'écriture.
        // la donnée lue est donc retournée exactement au même client.
        String s;
        while ((s = in.readLine()) != null) {
            System.out.println(s);
            if (s.isEmpty()) {
                break;
            }
        }

        out.write("HTTP/1.0 200 OK\r\n");
        out.write("Date: Fri, 31 Dec 1999 23:59:59 GMT\r\n");
        out.write("Server: Apache/0.8.4\r\n");
        out.write("Content-Type: text/html\r\n");
        out.write("Content-Length: 59\r\n");
        out.write("Expires: Sat, 01 Jan 2000 00:59:59 GMT\r\n");
        out.write("Last-modified: Fri, 09 Aug 1996 14:21:40 GMT\r\n");
        out.write("\r\n");
        out.write("<TITLE>Exemple</TITLE>");
        out.write("<P>Ceci est une page d'exemple.</P>");

        // on ferme les flux.
        System.err.println("Connexion avec le client terminée");
        out.close();
        in.close();
        clientSocket.close();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I tried this but it's still not working...(see my update). –  Smarty Twiti May 28 '12 at 17:28
    
Your request header read while loop is wrong. I will add a working example to my answer. –  Joel May 28 '12 at 18:15
    
Joel you forgot to flush the outputstream in your example. If you try this piece of code with a lot of HTML it does not work correctly. –  Anthony Chatellier Feb 17 '13 at 15:09
    
Forget my comment. –  Anthony Chatellier Feb 17 '13 at 15:33
add comment

This is an answer to your last question only and the reason that nothing is visible in the browser is because you calculated the number of characters incorrectly.

It should be 57 instead of 59.

Better yet is to have the number of characters calculated automatically but I believe that your sample is just a sample.

share|improve this answer
add comment

What machine are you using? What OS? If you're running a UNIX machine, then println won't work because it only sends a LF character. HTTP require CR and LF for its headers. Try adding \r to the end of your strings and see if that works.

Oh, also, your:

  out.println("HTTP/1.0 200 OK"+
"Date: Fri, 31 Dec 1999 23:59:59 GMT"+
"Server: Apache/0.8.4"+
"Content-Type: text/html"+
"Content-Length: 59"+
"Expires: Sat, 01 Jan 2000 00:59:59 GMT"+
"Last-modified: Fri, 09 Aug 1996 14:21:40 GMT"+

It's printing a single, long string.

Change those to a println for each string, or add \r\n in to the string.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks!,I have Windows7, i tried this but still it doesn't work.... –  Smarty Twiti May 28 '12 at 17:31
    
=> out.flush(); –  Smarty Twiti May 28 '12 at 18:14
add comment

You need the correct line separators (\r\n) between each line output. It is not enough to just concatenate them - which you can see if you print the response out.

share|improve this answer
    
He needs \r\n. This is HTTP. –  EJP May 28 '12 at 22:20
    
Thanks, fixed.. –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen May 28 '12 at 22:45
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.