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Postgres 8.4 here.

I'm trying to create a plpsql function that uses a CTE inside but it's giving me a syntax error. Are they not allowed?

(Something like this, bear in mind I'm wrinting this without my code) .....

With foo as (SELECT id,a as alias FROM foo);
UPDATE zoo SET b = alias FROM foo WHERE id = foo.id;
^Error here
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1  
remove the semicolon after foo) –  wildplasser May 28 '12 at 17:36
    
That's not the problem, I already tried. –  jpp1jpp1 May 30 '12 at 14:16

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted
WITH foo as (
    SELECT id
       , a AS zalias
    FROM footable
    )
UPDATE zoo z
SET b = f.zalias
FROM foo f
WHERE z.id = f.id
   ;

NOTE: "alias" is a reserved word.

UPDATE as of per comment by Erwin Brandstetter: the CTE is not valid in a UPDATE statement in 8.4. You'll need 9.1 or higher. Since a CTE is actually a kind of instant view, you could put the CTE body inside a view, and refer to that.

CREATE VIEW foo as (
    SELECT id
       , a AS zalias
    FROM footable
    );
UPDATE zoo z
SET b = f.zalias
FROM foo f
WHERE z.id = f.id
   ;
DROP VIEW foo;
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alias is a reserved word in SQL:1999 only, but not in later versions of the standard, and not in PostgreSQL. So it should be safe to use freely. –  Erwin Brandstetter May 28 '12 at 19:18
    
I stand corrected. I seem to remember that when functions had no named parameters (pg 8.3 ?) alias was a keyword. I still prefer to avoid it. –  wildplasser May 28 '12 at 19:37
    
Thanks, I ended up using the temp view approach. –  jpp1jpp1 May 30 '12 at 14:16
    
That's what we did in the old days, when we had no funky CTE's... –  wildplasser May 30 '12 at 21:13

A data modifying CTE (that's what it is) is not available in PostgreSQL 8.4.

Your statement would work with minor patches as @wildplasser demonstrates in PostgreSQL 9.1 or later, where data modifying CTE were introduced.

A very simple replacement for 8.4 would be a subquery:

UPDATE zoo z
SET    b = f.alias
FROM  (SELECT id, a as alias FROM foo) f
WHERE  z.id = f.id;

The example can be further simplified (but maybe the real world case is more complex):

UPDATE zoo z
SET    b = f.a
FROM   foo f
WHERE  z.id = f.id;

Remember to table-qualify the otherwise ambiguous column name id in the WHERE clause.

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Is it really a data modifying CTE? Looks like a common one, as it is not a DDL statement inside the CTE. –  vyegorov May 28 '12 at 19:35
    
@vyegorov: I was not sure myself at first. But I studied the manual and tried the test case on an 8.4 cluster: no joy. –  Erwin Brandstetter May 28 '12 at 19:53
    
I hesitated to also add that final reduction to update ... FROM ... –  wildplasser May 28 '12 at 21:20
    
@wildplasser: I only added it after I had seen that you didn't ... :) –  Erwin Brandstetter May 28 '12 at 21:28
1  
LOL. In most cases, the CTE will be used to wrap more complex queries. Including nested CTE's. Maybe I should add a recursive version, too? ;-) BTW:my habit of adding 'z' to suspect keywords should be pronounced just like the Germans pronounce 'the' ;-) ALSO: No SQL keyword starts with 'z'. –  wildplasser May 28 '12 at 21:53

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