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I'd like to have a class with two array subscript operator overloads: one used for reading and the other for writing.

The pourpose is to keep a counter of changes. I read (at http://faculty.cs.niu.edu/~mcmahon/CS241/c241man/node97.html) that I could do something like this:

template<typename T>
class Array
{
public:
    Array()
    {
        data = new T[100];
    }

    T &operator[] (int index)
    {
        cout << "Is writing\n";
        changes++;
        return data[index];
    }

    T operator[] (int index) const
    {
        cout << "Is reading\n";
        return data[index];
    }

private:
    T *data;
    int changes;
};

But that doesn't work in my case. I'm using g++ 4.7 with -std=c++11 and actually only "Is writing" is printed on screen, even if I do:

Array<int> a;
a[0] = 3;
cout << a[0] << endl;

I also noticed that the latter is never called by inspecting the source with gcov. Is the method on that page completely wrong, or is something I'm misinterpreting?

Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is only a rough idea and I haven't thought about all the implications, but a proxy class with overloaded assignment and cast operators could solve your problem:

template<typename T>
class CountingProxy
{
public:
    CountingProxy(int& counter, T& ref) : counter_(counter), ref_(ref)
    {
    }

    CountingProxy<T>& operator=(const T& o)
    {
        cout << "Is writing\n";
        counter_++;
        ref_ = o;
        return *this;
    }

    operator T()
    {
        cout << "Is reading\n";
        return ref_;
    }

private:
    int& counter_;
    T& ref_;
};

template<typename T>
class Array
{
public:
    Array()
    {
        data = new T[100];
    }

    CountingProxy<T> operator[] (int index)
    {        
        return CountingProxy<T>(changes, data[index]);
    }

    T operator[] (int index) const
    {
        cout << "Is reading\n";
        return data[index];
    }

private:
    T *data;
    int changes;
};

On the other hand, you probably would be better off by implementing separate functions for reading and writing elements of your array, such as T& get(int index), const T& get(int index) const and void put(int index, const T& value).

share|improve this answer
    
Well, pretty ugly... But (didn't test) might work. Just wandering how much overhead would this add. I really wan't to avoid get & set, since I'm implementing an alternative to std::vector. – AlfaOmega08 May 28 '12 at 19:15
    
This definitely works, with some adaptations. However I had to add "bool CountingProxy::operator ==(const T &compare) const" to make it work with gtest. The strange thing is that I can do "bool a = array[0] > 3" without implementing operator>. Only operator== is required for gtest. Can you think why? – AlfaOmega08 May 28 '12 at 22:11
    
On a decent compiler, this should add minimal to no overhead. array[0] > 3 works because CountingProxy<T> can implicitly be converted to T, thanks to the overloaded cast operator. – reima May 28 '12 at 23:44
    
And that was the expected behaviour. But gtest doesn't work without operator==?? Maybe it uses some particular comparison method?? – AlfaOmega08 May 29 '12 at 7:43
    
What does "doesn't work" mean? It won't compile? If so, with what compiler error? If not, does the runtime behavior differ from your expectations? – reima May 29 '12 at 11:17

const overloads are only called if this is const. It's not determined on whether it's a "read" or a "write" operation.

share|improve this answer
    
that was my first tought. I already used const methods in the past, but reading from that page made me believe it was a particular syntax... – AlfaOmega08 May 28 '12 at 17:47

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