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I have always thought that there is no possible formatting on the command line, as everything I have read says.

However, I recently discovered that pywikipedia (a python bot framework for automatically editing wikipedia-style wikis) can output text to the command line (the normal windows cmd.exe) in different colours!

image depicting command-line colours

This is the python syntax:

import wikipedia
wikipedia.output(u"\03{lightpurple}"+s+"\03{default}")

You have to use wikipedia.output() (or pywikibot.output()) but not just print.

The online pywikipedia repository (around line 7990) gives a short explanation:

text can contain special sequences to create colored output. These
consist of the escape character \03 and the color name in curly braces,
e. g. \03{lightpurple}. \03{default} resets the color.

I thinks it is probably to do with this line:

ui.output(text, toStdout = toStdout)

But I can't find any reference to a ui class.

So how does Pywikipedia manage it?

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1  
Here's a tool that can do it - the source code might be informative: pypi.python.org/pypi/clint –  Thomas K May 28 '12 at 18:30
1  
Where did you read that? Nearly every terminal is capable of color output. –  Wooble May 28 '12 at 19:19
    
@Thomas, Thanks for that. Although I haven't found the definate answer, there are some links and stuff in there that will help. –  ACarter May 28 '12 at 19:39
    
@Wooble, so I have realised... :) –  ACarter May 28 '12 at 19:39
    
possible duplicate of How can I color Python logging output? –  Peter O. Nov 7 '12 at 20:37

1 Answer 1

I don't know if you can use the ANSI Code on Windows.
But in Python you could write make it like that :

 >>> print "\033[0;32m"+ "Green" +"\033[0m"
 Green

I saw it here.

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