Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

According to C++11 9.1/7 (draft n3376), a standard-layout class is a class that:

  • has no non-static data members of type non-standard-layout class (or array of such types) or reference,

  • has no virtual functions (10.3) and no virtual base classes (10.1),

  • has the same access control (Clause11) for all non-static data members,

  • has no non-standard-layout base classes,

  • either has no non-static data members in the most derived class and at most one base class with non-static data members, or has no base classes with non-static data members, and

  • has no base classes of the same type as the first non-static data member.

it follows that an empty class is a standard-layout class; and that another class with an empty class as a base is also a standard-layout class provided the first non-static data member of such class is not of the same type as the base.

Furthermore, 9.2/19 states that:

A pointer to a standard-layout struct object, suitably converted using a reinterpret_cast, points to its initial member (or if that member is a bit-field, then to the unit in which it resides) and vice versa. [ Note: There might therefore be unnamed padding within a standard-layout struct object, but not at its beginning, as necessary to achieve appropriate alignment. —end note]

This seems to imply that the Empty Base Class Optimization is now a mandatory optimization, at least for standard-layout classes. My point is that if the empty base optimization isn't mandated, then the layout of a standard-layout class would not be standard but rather depend on whether the implementation implements or not said optimization. Is my reasoning correct, or am I missing something?

share|improve this question
    
Your title seems misleading -- it's a given that empty bases do not break standard layout, and your question seems to be more about empty base optimization. –  ildjarn May 28 '12 at 18:26
    
@ildjarn: My point is that if the empty base optimization isn't mandated, then the layout of a standard-layout class would not be standard but depend on whether the implementation implements or not the optimization. But 9.2/19 seems to mandate such optimization. If you could suggest a better title, I'd happily change it. –  K-ballo May 28 '12 at 18:29
1  
You're reasoning seems correct. Post it as your own answer. ;) –  edA-qa mort-ora-y May 28 '12 at 18:31
    
Your last paragraph sums it up nicely I think -- something like "Is the Empty Base Class Optimization now a mandatory optimization, at least for standard-layout classes?" –  ildjarn May 28 '12 at 18:32
    
I think you are misinterpreting the text. The first member of a derived class is the base class (empty, or not). –  Bo Persson May 28 '12 at 18:35
show 7 more comments

1 Answer

up vote 15 down vote accepted

Yes, you're correct, that was pointed out in the "PODs revisited" proposals: http://www.open-std.org/jtc1/sc22/WG21/docs/papers/2007/n2342.htm#ABI

The Embarcadero compiler docs also state it: http://docwiki.embarcadero.com/RADStudio/en/Is_standard_layout

Another key point is [class.mem]/16

Two standard-layout struct (Clause 9) types are layout-compatible if they have the same number of non-static data members and corresponding non-static data members (in declaration order) have layout-compatible types (3.9).

Note that only data members affect layout compatibility, not base classes, so these two standard layout classes are layout-compatible:

struct empty { };
struct stdlayout1 : empty { int i; };

struct stdlayout2 { int j; };
share|improve this answer
    
Is "initial sequence" actually defined? Where? What is it? Are base subobjects actually guaranteed to come first, before members? –  Kerrek SB Feb 17 at 20:28
    
I.e. if I have struct A { char x[17]; }; struct B { char x[9]; };, could it be that struct Foo : A { int foo; }; and struct Bar : B { int bar; } have the same initial sequence, because they both start with int? –  Kerrek SB Feb 17 at 20:29
    
Ah, never mind! To be standard layout, you cannot have data members both in a base and in the most-derived class. Problem solved. –  Kerrek SB Feb 17 at 20:33
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.