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I'm sure this has been asked before, but it's just hard to search for... So, what I've got is a function that accepts a function pointer. This function pointer has, say, 3 arguments. So, I want to pass to another function, the same pointer, but with 2 arguments filled in.

So, something like this:

int func1 (int (*funcptr)(int, int, int)) {
  return func2(funcptr(,8,9));
}

int func2 (int (*funcptr)(int)) {
  return (*funcptr)(2);
}

EDIT: Ok so I got this now with the usage of a lambda

int func2(int (*funcptr2)(int)) {
  return (*funcptr2)(2);
}
int func1(int (*funcptr1)(int, int, int)) {
  return func2(
    [funcptr1](int i)->int {
      return (*funcptr1)(i,8,9);
    }
  );
}

But it's giving me

"cannot convert func1(int (*)(int, int, int))::<lambda(int)> to int (*)(int) for argument 1 to int func2(int (*)(int))"

share|improve this question
3  
See std::bind (it's also in boost) – Pubby May 28 '12 at 19:28
    
See the "perfect forwarding" too (you can google it). C++11 standard has enabled perfect forwarding exactly for you cases. – Vladimir Sinenko May 29 '12 at 18:44
up vote 1 down vote accepted

To answer your updated question, a lambda which captures variables (as your lambda does with funcptr1) cannot be converted to a function pointer. Intuitively this makes sense since your lambda must store this captured variable per lambda; whereas there is no way to do that with a function pointer.

The best solution is probably to take an argument of type std::function, which is a wrapper for any callable type:

int func2(std::function<int(int)> funcptr2) {
  return funcptr2(2);
}
int func1(std::function<int(int,int,int)> funcptr1) {
  return func2(
    [funcptr1](int i)->int {
      return funcptr1(i,8,9);
    }
  );
}

You can also use templates to make your functions work for any callable type:

template <typename F>
int func2(F funcptr2) {
  return funcptr2(2);
}
template <typename F>
int func1(F funcptr1) {
  return func2(
    [funcptr1](int i)->int {
      return funcptr1(i,8,9);
    }
  );
}
share|improve this answer

This is called a lambda, and you can do it with newer C++ versions, std::bind, boost::bind or boost::function.

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2  
A lambda (i.e, inline function definition) is one way of implementing this task. This task, however, is specifically known as a "partial application" of a function: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Partial_application – duskwuff May 28 '12 at 19:36
1  
So, would I do something like return func2([](int x){funcptr(x,8,9);}) – Jay May 28 '12 at 19:39
    
@duskwuff: I've used the term more generally (to include partial application and similar generic function generation mechanisms), but I think my usage is incorrect, at least in the C++ world. – David Schwartz May 28 '12 at 20:13
    
I can't figure out how to use a lambda. I've updated my question. – Jay May 29 '12 at 2:43

In C, you can't. You would have to pass the function pointer, and the two arguments.

In C++, you can use std::bind (or boost::bind in older versions) to achieve this.

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