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We are planning to make a "large" website for I'd say 5000 up to many more users. We think of putting in lots of real time functionality, where data changes instantly propagate to all connected clients. New frameworks like Meteor and DerbyJS look really promising for this kind of stuff.

Now, I wonder if it is possible to do typical backend stuff like sending (bulk) emails, cleaning up the database, generating pdfs, etc. with those new frameworks. And in a way that is productive and doesn't suck. I also wonder how difficult it is to create complex forms with them. I got used to the convenient Rails view helpers and Ruby gems to handle those kind of things.

Meteor and DerbyJS are both quite new, so I do expect lots of functionality will be added in the near future. However, I also wonder if it might be a good idea to combine those frameworks with a "traditional" Rails app, that serves up certain complex pages which do not need realtime updates. And/or with a Rails or Sinatra app that provides an API to do the heavy backend processing. Those Rails apps could then access the same databases then the Meteor/DerbyJS app. Anyone thinks this is a good idea? Or rather not? Why?

It would be nice if anyone with sufficient experience with those new "single page app realtime" frameworks could comment on this. Where are they heading towards? Will they be able to handle "complete" web apps with authentication and backend processing? Will it be as productive/convenient to program with them as with Rails? Well, I guess no one can know that for sure yet ;-) Well, any thoughts, guesses and ideas are welcome!

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

For things like sending bulk emails and generating PDFs, Derby let's you simply use normal Node.js modules. npm now has over 10,000 packages, so there are packages for most things you might want to do on the server. Derby doesn't control your server, and it works on top of any normal Express server. You should probably stick with Node.js code as much as possible and not use Rails along with Derby. That is not to say that you can't send messages to a separate Rails app, but since you already have to have a Node.js app running to host Derby, you might as well use it for stuff like this.

To communicate with such server-side code, you can use Derby's model events. We are still exploring how this kind of code works and we don't have a lot of examples, but it is something that we will have a clear story around. We are building an app ourselves that communicates with an email server, so we should have some real experience with this pretty soon.

You can also just use a normal AJAX request or send a message over Socket.IO manually if you don't want to use the Derby model to do this kind of communication. You are free to make your own server-side only routes with Express along with your Derby app routes. We think it is nice to have this kind of flexibility in case there are any use cases that we didn't properly anticipate with the framework.

As far as creating forms goes, Derby has a very powerful templating system, and I am working on making it a lot better still. We are working on a new UI components feature that will make it possible to build libraries of self-contained UI widgets that can simply be dropped into a Derby app while still playing nicely with automatic view-model bindings and data syncing. Once this feature is completed, I think form component libraries will be written rather quickly.

We do expect to include all of the features needed for a normal app, much like Rails does. It won't look like Rails or work like Rails, but it will be similarly feature complete eventually.

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Thanks for the answer! Derby looks quite promising ;-) –  Nico May 30 '12 at 11:08
    
I wonder if productivity and ease of use will be anywhere near Rails. :) From reading the derby docs, it seems code is less readable to me then ruby code (maybe its the underscores or short variable names, not sure). Also concepts in derby seem pretty complex, so looks like a steep learning curve. But maybe that has also to do with node.js which I haven't looked at much yet. –  Nico Jun 1 '12 at 9:11

For backend tasks (such as sending emails, cleaning up the database, generating pdfs) it's better to use resque or sidekiq

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Can you use those directly from Meteor/Derby, without a rails/sinatra app? –  Nico May 28 '12 at 20:36
    
Also, my question is not only about background jobs, but also about stuff one can might do during a request, like generating a pdf, or simply rendering complex views with rails helpers or code from gems. –  Nico May 28 '12 at 20:46

Now, I wonder if it is possible to do typical backend stuff like sending (bulk) emails, cleaning up the database, generating pdfs, etc. with those new frameworks. And in a way that is productive and doesn't suck. I also wonder how difficult it is to create complex forms with them. I got used to the convenient Rails view helpers and Ruby gems to handle those kind of things.

Also, my question is not only about background jobs, but also about stuff one can might do during a request, like generating a pdf, or simply rendering complex views with rails helpers or code from gems. –

You're mixing metaphors here - a single page app is just a site where the content is loaded without doing a full page reload, be that a front end in pure js or you could use normal html and pjax.

The kind of things you are describing would be done in a background task regardless of the fornt-end framework you used. But +1 for sidekiq if you're using ruby.

As for notifying all the other users of things that have changed, you can look into using http://pusher.com or http://pubnub.com if you don't want to maintain a websocket server.

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Do you know Meteor or DerbyJS? I'm actually preferably looking for an answer from those who do. ;-) I know what a single page app is. Also, no, not all that I describe would be done in a background task, like I said, rendering complex views is not done in the background. Same as rendering simple pdfs. But those are just examples. Pusher for example is great! But you can't compare it to Meteor or Derby, they are frameworks which do most of the complicated stuff for you, like automatic synchronization of data. With pusher you have to do all this yourself. –  Nico May 29 '12 at 5:22
    
sending (bulk) emails, cleaning up the database, generating pdfs, etc. Are most definitely tasks you do in background tasks, and if you take a look at Meteor you will see that it will not help you in this regard. Perhaps you should investigate what these frameworks actually give you, because you'll still need rails or something else to do the heavy lifting. –  MatthewFord May 29 '12 at 8:23
    
That is exactly my question. If you had read for example the beginning of the derby docs, you would have noticed that they see derby as a replacement for rails. Sending bulk emails is a background thing, I agree, but creating pdfs can easily be done on the fly for simple pdfs. But that's not the point. My point is, there are also some things Rails helps you a lot with, that are NOT background tasks. Will Meteor/DerbyJS give us equally convenient tools for all our needs? –  Nico May 29 '12 at 10:09

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