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In the <head> of my page, I do this:

<script type="text/javascript" src="js/foo.js"></script>
<script type="text/javascript">
  console.log(foo.bar);
</script>

Code of foo.js:

var foo = function()
{
    this.bar = function()
    {
        console.log('here');
    }
}

Later on in the html document:

<a href="#" onclick="foo.bar();">Test</a>

However if I click that link above, it says function not defined even though foo.js has been included. Also if I do console.log(foo) it only shows 'function()' and console.log(foo.bar) shows undefined. Why is this, why can't I access the function?

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1  
I'm not going to go into an edit war, but the web-development tag is way too broad and not really useful in any form. The question isn't even specific to web development, it's purely JavaScript. Also, this has nothing to do with jQuery. –  Juhana May 28 '12 at 20:30
1  
@Juhana: indeed ;-) –  zerkms May 28 '12 at 20:32
1  
It's not jQuery either! –  ErJab May 28 '12 at 20:33
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6 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I'm not sure if you want it this way, but to get your console.log(foo.bar); to work you can do this:

var foo = {
    bar: function() {
        console.log('here');
    }
};
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Because you haven't created an object. This is a correct way of running your code:

var foo = function()
{
    this.bar = function()
    {
        console.log('here');
    }
}

var instance = new foo();
instance.bar();

http://jsfiddle.net/zerkms/wDaEn/

Or, you can define it in another way:

var foo = {
    bar: function() {
        console.log('here');
    }
};

foo.bar();​

http://jsfiddle.net/zerkms/wDaEn/1/

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Since you are using this and creating instance class member, you need to instantiate the class first:

var fooClass = new foo;
console.log(fooClass.bar());
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If I don't want to initialize it that way, what would I have to do? –  Click Upvote May 28 '12 at 20:28
    
@ClickUpvote: Simply dont use this keyword in your object eg bar: function() { console.log('here'); } –  Sarfraz May 28 '12 at 20:28
    
then How would I be able to call the bar function of foo object in the onclick of the hyperlink? Right now I'm doing <a onclick='foo.bar();'> –  Click Upvote May 28 '12 at 20:34
1  
@Click Upvote: see the second part of my answer and jsfiddle.net/zerkms/wDaEn/1 –  zerkms May 28 '12 at 20:34
1  
@ClickUpvote: Thats correct as long as you dont need a class and your bar function looks like bar: function() { console.log('here'); } –  Sarfraz May 28 '12 at 20:37
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For minimal code changes use the following:

<script type="text/javascript">
    var foo = function()
    {
        this.bar = function()
        {
           console.log('here');
        };
        return this; // magic yes ?
    };


foo().bar();
</script>
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The content of foo.js just initializes foo to a function... What's in the implentation has no importance until foo() is called. So foo.bar is undefined.

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The above answers are not all correct, remember javascript has no concept of classes or instances of said classes. I would do some reading on Javascript scope and closures.

When you assign your object to the variable name bar, you are assigning it to the local scope. You are then attempting to access your local function from a global context. This is wrong.

I am willing to bet you are attempting something along the following:-

var foo = {
      bar: function() {

      }
}

Etc...

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