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This is part of a .c file that in included into a tcp server-client message service that has one client per thread; I want to use select inside the server thread to handle new incoming connections or data being written in a buffer but the problem I have is that I need the socket file descriptor to do that of the clients and of the server.

In this part of the code the socket descriptor of the server is inside s->sd but I can seem to access it outside this function because it returns (socket).

What can I do? (large parts of code are omitted to make it readable)

#include <sys/types.h>
#include <sys/socket.h>
#include <arpa/inet.h>

typedef struct {
  int sd; //id of the socket??
  char *ip_addr;
  int port;   
  } MySocket;   

Socket tcp_passive_open(int port) 
{                                                                                      
  MySocket *s = (MySocket *)malloc( sizeof(MySocket) );
  struct sockaddr_in addr;
  s->sd = socket(PROTOCOLFAMILY, TYPE, PROTOCOL);

  memset(&addr, 0, sizeof(struct sockaddr_in));
  addr.sin_family = PROTOCOLFAMILY;
  addr.sin_addr.s_addr = htonl(INADDR_ANY);
  addr.sin_port = htons(port);

  if ( bind(s->sd, (struct sockaddr *)&addr, sizeof(addr)) != 0 ) {
    die("tcp_open_server failed(): bind() failed"); 
  }

  s->port = port;
  s->ip_addr = NULL;  //INADDR_ANY ...  
  return (Socket)s;  
}

main:

Socket server = tcp_passive_open( PORT );
FD_SET(SOCKETDESCRIPTOR_SERVER??,&master_socketDescriptors);
share|improve this question
    
s is a pointer. You attempt to return the struct. Return the pointer instead (you will need to change the function's return type) . And remove all the casts, except the (struct sockaddr *). Also what is Socket? should that be MySocket? –  wildplasser May 28 '12 at 20:56
    
bedankt wildplasser :) the problem is though that i want to try it without changing tcp_passive_open but maybe that's not possible. And socket is a filetype: i think (it not the struct no). So you're solution is not much help I'm afraid. –  Thomas May 28 '12 at 21:00
    
Why do you want to return Socket, while you just had the type MySocket typedeffed, malloc()ed, and initialised. Makes no sense to me. (IANAB;-) –  wildplasser May 28 '12 at 21:06
    
What is Socket? There is no definition for it in your code. –  betabandido May 28 '12 at 21:07
    
it's from the socket api (edit: i will add the include so it's clear) –  Thomas May 28 '12 at 21:11

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

MySocket::sd is the descriptor you need to use with select(). Both socket() and accept() return socket descriptors that can be used with select(). Change tcp_passive_open() to return a MySocket* instead of a Socket, then your main server thread will have access to the server's socket descriptor to pass to select() for detecting incoming connections, eg:

#include <sys/types.h>
#include <sys/socket.h>
#include <arpa/inet.h>

typedef struct {
    int sd;
    char *ip_addr;
    int port;
} MySocket;

MySocket* tcp_passive_open(int port) {
    MySocket *s = (MySocket *)malloc( sizeof(MySocket) );
    if ( s == NULL ) {
        die("tcp_open_server failed(): malloc() failed");
    }

    s->sd = socket(PROTOCOLFAMILY, TYPE, PROTOCOL);
    if ( s->sd == -1 ) {
        die("tcp_open_server failed(): socket() failed");
    }

    struct sockaddr_in addr;
    memset(&addr, 0, sizeof(struct sockaddr_in));
    addr.sin_family = PROTOCOLFAMILY;
    addr.sin_addr.s_addr = htonl(INADDR_ANY);
    addr.sin_port = htons(port);

    if ( bind(s->sd, (struct sockaddr *)&addr, sizeof(addr)) != 0 ) {
        die("tcp_open_server failed(): bind() failed");
    }

    s->port = port;
    s->ip_addr = NULL;  //INADDR_ANY ...
    return s;
}

.

MySocket* server = tcp_passive_open( PORT );
FD_SET(server->sd, &master_socketDescriptors); 

Afterwards, when select() reports a pending inbound connection connection on the server socket, call accept() to accept the connection and obtain its socket descriptor, then you can allocate a separate MySocket for it:

int sd = accept(server->sd, ...);
if ( sd != -1 ) {
    MySocket *client = (MySocket*) malloc(sizeof(MySocket));
    client->sd = sd;
    ...
}

Then you can create a new thread for that MySocket, and that thread can call select() to detect inbound data on that connection as needed.

share|improve this answer
    
thx; i wanted to preserve tcp_passive_open because i supposly don't have acces to it (only to the .h file). Remember the "Socket server = tcp_passive_open( PORT );" is in another c file which include the .h file of the file where tcp_passive_open is defined. However i forgot to mention that inside that .h file there is a declaration: "typedef void * Socket;" maybe this could be used to get the socket descriptor? –  Thomas May 30 '12 at 7:02
    
ok; i solved it apparently this socket can be reconverted to the MySocket struct using: Socket server = tcp_passive_open( PORT ); MySocket *s = (MySocket *)server; printf("socket descriptor: %d",s->sd); I don't know however why it needed to be converted to the socket (or why all the functions return socket instead of MySocket) but that's something i'll ask the person who gave me those files. Thank you very much –  Thomas May 30 '12 at 7:33
    
Typical encapsulation practice. Whoever wrote the code in the first place was trying to hide the details of MySocket from outside code. That is why Socket maps to a plain void* pointer. That way, the contents of MySocket can be changed without affecting outside code. In which case, that code should have exposed some kind of tcp_accept() and tcp_select() functions that take Socket as input and handle the socket descriptors internally for you. If the code does not have such functions, then that was probably either an oversight or just sloppy programming on the author's part. –  Remy Lebeau May 30 '12 at 8:19
    
no it does have these functions but I needed the socket descriptors for the select; is it better to add functions that also handle these socket descriptors inside that same file; because to me this makes it a lot more complex –  Thomas May 30 '12 at 8:51

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