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I have this provided function that I want to use:

boolean check(Comparable<Object> obj1, Comparable<Object> obj2) {
   // do something
}

and I have:

Object obj1,obj2;

that I want to send to method check, how can I cast or convert the two Objects to Comparables ?

I wish I was clear, thank you.

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1  
The 'provided function' is incorrectly declared. Nothing implements Comparable<Object>, at least nothing should. It should be Comparable<T>. –  EJP May 28 '12 at 22:12

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Well, if your two object references are truly pointing to Comparable objects, you could simply do

check((Comparable<Object>) obj1, (Comparable<Object>) obj2);

-EDIT-

Of course this generates a warning, you are basically telling the compiler that you know better. The compiler is warning you that there is chance you could be wrong if obj is not truly what you said it was in terms of its generic type parameter. You can tell your compiler to shut up, that you are really, really sure, using an annotation:

@SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
Comparable<Object> cmp1 = (Comparable<Object>) obj;
@SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
Comparable<Object> cmp2 = (Comparable<Object>) obj;     
check(cmp1,cmp2);

When you use a @SupressWarning annotation you typically add a comment indicating why you are so positively sure that the unsafe cast will always succeed.

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I have to use object, because I get it from obj1 = obj.getClass().getField(str); and the solution : check((Comparable<Object>) obj1, (Comparable<Object>) obj2); is giving a warnings . –  nabil May 28 '12 at 21:06
    
Of course it generates a warning, you are basically telling the compiler that you know better. The compiler is warning you that there is chance you could be wrong if obj is not truly what you said it was. You can tell that compiler that you are really, really sure using a annotation: @SuppressWarnings("unchecked") Comparable<Object> cmp = (Comparable<Object>) obj –  Edwin Dalorzo May 28 '12 at 21:53

As you said:

check((Comparable<Object>) obj1, (Comparable<Object>) obj2);

That said, I don't know of any class that implements Comparable<Object>. The method should probably take Comparable<?> as arguments rather than Comparable<Object>.

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the method is provided I can't change the interface. and the : check((Comparable<Object>) obj1, (Comparable<Object>) obj2); is giving warning. –  nabil May 28 '12 at 21:08
2  
It's giving a warning because due to type erasure, there is no way to check that an Object implements Comparable<Object>. And you're lucky, because your Object does not implement Comparable<Object>. It could implement Comparable<Something>, or the raw Comparable. But it doesn't matter much, because the type is erased anyway, and the check method doesn't really care about the type. Everything will probably work if your Object implements Comparable<Anything> or Comparable. It's just that the check method doesn't have the correct signature. –  JB Nizet May 28 '12 at 21:14

Don't use

Object obj1, obj2;

but rather

Comparable obj1, obj2;
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2  
Raw types? No, thank you. –  JB Nizet May 28 '12 at 20:53
    
@JBNizet: agree, but unless he tells us what types he's using, the best we can do is Comparable<?>. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels May 28 '12 at 20:54
1  
Yes. But you said Comparable in your answer. And Comparable<?> is not the same as Comparable<Object>. –  JB Nizet May 28 '12 at 20:54
    
Or... Comparable<? extends Object>? Also yuck. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels May 28 '12 at 20:58
1  
Comparable<? extends Object> is the same as Comparable<?>. Comparable<Object> just doesn't make sense. –  JB Nizet May 28 '12 at 20:59

Objects you want to send to this method must be type of Comparable. So they must implement Comparable interface.

Comparable obj1 = new Comparable() {
    // ... realize compare method
}

then you can send this object to your function.

If you have your own class implement interface this way:

public class MyClass implements Comparable {
    // realize compare method
}
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i get obj1 for example from this : obj1 = obj.getClass().getField(str); –  nabil May 28 '12 at 21:19
    
sure that your object is comparable? If so you can try another answers to this post. Try : Comparable comp1 = (Comparable) obj1; If there will not be an Exception, you can send to your function comp1 –  alaster May 28 '12 at 21:26

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