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I'm a newbie in c++, and i try to create an array of objects. I use a code like

const int SORT_SIZE = 20;

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    CSimple * data;
    data = new CSimple[SORT_SIZE];

    for(int i = 0; i < SORT_SIZE; i++)
    {
/*Access violation here*/   *(data + i * (sizeof(CSimple))) = *(new CSimple(rand() % 10000));
    }

and in my cycle on i = 5 i get access violation. sizeof(CSimple) is 8 (there's only one int field there) if it matters

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Sorry, deleting my answer - after rereading your code there was enough wrong with what I said that it was better to just delete. –  djechlin May 28 '12 at 20:59
1  
Take out the * (sizeof(CSimple) –  Paul R May 28 '12 at 20:59
    
@PaulR is right. The compiler takes care of scaling the integer operand of pointer arithmetic operations by the size of the pointed-to object, so when you do it also, you're moving further than you think you are. –  tmpearce May 28 '12 at 21:04
    
Oh, and sorry @PaulR for you answer too. I just don't understand you at the beginning but now i see you were right also! So hard to be a newbie:) Thank yoU! –  Mikhail Ivanov May 28 '12 at 21:07

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Replace the line within the for-loop with data[i] = CSimple(rand() % 10000). Much more readabale, isn't it?

The reason your code failed is because data + i does not increment data by i bytes but by i CSimple's. Say, if CSimple is four bytes long, then data + i * sizeof(CSimple) would increment data by 16 bytes instead of 4.

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&data[i], no? Edit: no, memory already aloc'ed, so delete new. –  djechlin May 28 '12 at 20:56
    
@djechlin Edit: It seems we were both incorrect (and corrected ourselves simultaniously). –  AardvarkSoup May 28 '12 at 21:01
    
you r right, TY! –  Mikhail Ivanov May 28 '12 at 21:05

As a newbie, why don't you make your life easier and use types that do the hard work for you automatically?

#include <vector>

const int SORT_SIZE = 20;

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    std::vector<CSimple> data;

    for(int i = 0; i < SORT_SIZE; i++)
    {
        data.push_back( CSimple(rand() % 10000) );
    }
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