Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I recently ran into a problem with COM inproc server.

I have a MCanvasFont COM object that implements ICanvasFont interface:

ICanvasFont : public IUnknown
{
    virtual HRESULT STDMETHODCALLTYPE Create(
        /* [in] */ BSTR bstrFamily,
        /* [in] */ double fSize) = 0;

    virtual HRESULT STDMETHODCALLTYPE SetSize(
        /* [retval][out] */ double fSize) = 0;
};

The MCanvasFont objects holds an opaque pointer to a FontDelegate object that implements the actual font operations:

class MCanvasFont : public ICanvasFont
{
public:
    MCanvasFont();
    virtual ~MCanvasFont();

    virtual HRESULT STDMETHODCALLTYPE QueryInterface(const IID& iid, void** ppv);
    virtual ULONG   STDMETHODCALLTYPE AddRef();
    virtual ULONG   STDMETHODCALLTYPE Release();

    virtual HRESULT STDMETHODCALLTYPE Create(
        /* [in] */ BSTR bstrFamily,
        /* [in] */ double fSize);

    virtual HRESULT STDMETHODCALLTYPE SetSize(
        /* [in] */ double fSize);

protected:
    class FontDelegate;
    const std::unique_ptr<FontDelegate> m_font; // opaque pointer

    // Reference count
    long m_cRef;
};

There is also a MCanvas class that implements the ICanvas interface. The ICanvas interface has the SetFont(ICanvasFont* pFont) abstract method to set current font and the DrawText method to draw a text onto the canvas:

class MCanvas : public ICanvas
{
public:
    MCanvas();
    virtual ~MCanvas();

    virtual HRESULT STDMETHODCALLTYPE QueryInterface(const IID& iid, void** ppv);
    virtual ULONG   STDMETHODCALLTYPE AddRef();
    virtual ULONG   STDMETHODCALLTYPE Release();

    STDMETHODDECL GetFont(
        /* [retval][out] */ ICanvasFont** ppFont);
    STDMETHODDECL SetFont(
        /* [in] */ ICanvasFont* pFont);

    // ...

    STDMETHODDECL DrawText(
        /* [in] */ double x,
        /* [in] */ double y,
        /* [in] */ BSTR text);

protected:
    COMAutoPtr<ICanvasPen>     m_pen;
    COMAutoPtr<ICanvasBrush>   m_brush;
    COMAutoPtr<ICanvasFont>    m_font;

    // Reference count
    long m_cRef;
};

I need a way to get access to FontDelegate object from MCanvas::DrawText method. What's the best way to do this?

share|improve this question
    
This is not easy, at least without violating COM principles. To this end I usually write a method returning a void* to the internal handle, and hide it to automation (I mainly use IDispatch objects, so dirty interfaces don't bother me as long as the scripting client sees nothing). I'd be interested in something less dirty too. –  Alexandre C. May 28 '12 at 21:56
1  
Why do you need to directly access the MCanvasFont::FontDelegate from MCanvas::DrawText? Maybe you should change your design so that the features of FontDelegate required by MCanvas::DrawText are exposed via additional methods of ICanvasFont interface (so you can simply call these methods from MCanvas::DrawText, without breaking COM principles). –  user1149224 May 28 '12 at 22:18
    
@Alexandre C, Yes, the returning of void* was the first thing I thought of. Another way seems to be to cast from ICanvasFont to MCanvasFont. But maybe there are better methods to do this?! –  ezpresso May 28 '12 at 22:25
    
@Mr_C64, I'd like to reduce all the internal compilation dependencies and not to declare FontDelegate as COM interface. –  ezpresso May 28 '12 at 22:55
    
The problem with the void* approach is that it is not marshalling friendly. Another option is to provide another interface IFontDelegateProvider which could handle marshalling of the FontDelegate in case you would need it, and which provides access to a FontDelegate object or its methods. I'm afraid this is the cleanest solution. –  Alexandre C. May 29 '12 at 6:28

2 Answers 2

Another way seems to be to cast from ICanvasFont to MCanvasFont.

One COM-friendly way to do this is to define a private GUID that represents your class "as-is": have MCanvasFont respond to this in its QI by returning a non-casted 'this'. The MCanvas can then use QI with this private GUID to check if the ICanvasFont is really a MCanvasFont; if QI succeeds, it now has a properly-casted MCanvasFont to play with.

This allows 3rd party code to obtain and pass around objects they get from you as opaque COM objects, but when you get one of your own objects back, you can determine that it's actually 'one of your own', and then access its internals appropriately.

This technique has the benefit that it fails gracefully in unsupported scenarios - you can think of it as a safe COM-style cast that gets you from the agnostic world of COM back to the world of C++:

If a 3rd party attempts to implement ICanvasFont themselves, then of course it will fail the QI test since they won't be implementing the private GUID, so you'll know to reject it, which is appropriate, because it sounds like your code is using this interface as an abstraction of your library's functionality, not as an extensibility point.

If you received a ICanvasFont that was a remote object, QI would fail because the COM remoting infrastructure won't be able to find proxy/stub information for your private GUID, and again this is likely appropriate if you're not looking at providing remoting or cross-apartment/multithread support in this scenario.


...or at least that's how it could work if you have a simple GUI/STA-flavor object that expects to be used within a single thread (apartment). If you allow your interfaces to be marshaled to different apartments within a process, you need to do a bit more work on the general theme above, since you might actually want to support being handed a ICanvasFont that was originated on anther apartment. You can still use QI with a private GUID to ask if the object is "one of yours", but now you'd need to QI to an intermediate private interface that also has marshalling support, and then has a method that you can tunnel a raw pointer through (and, for paranoia's sake, check that the object is in the same process!); and once you do that, you need to be aware that you're taking on all marshalling/threading responsibility from there on. But given the GUI-flavor nature of your question, I'm guessing this may not be the case here.

share|improve this answer

Perhaps I'm missing something. Can't you simply declare MCanvas as a friend class within MCanvasFont, then downcast the ICanvasFont pointer to MCanvasFont within MCanvas::DrawText?

It should be noted that the ICanvasFont pointer you are working with may not be of type MCanvasFont. If you use dynamic_cast for the downcast, this should only succeed in cases where the ICanvasFont pointer you have been given originated from the same in-proc server as your MCanvas instance. This is the only scenario I can see that what you are trying to do is even possible. But you should detect and verify that you're operating in this context before attempting to access the FontDelegate.

share|improve this answer
1  
Well, COM is language agnostic, and all you manipulate is pointers to function tables. There is no safe way to downcast anything, since eg. the actual ICanvasFont you are given may be a (automatically generated) proxy for some object executing remotely. –  Alexandre C. May 29 '12 at 6:32
    
Perhaps I'm being too cynical here, but I've been assuming that what was asked for is essentially a back door hack (see comments added). Creating a safe solution for the general case seems obviously impossible. It would be interesting to be proved wrong. –  Paul Keister May 29 '12 at 19:37

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.