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(a) Let T be a minimum spanning tree of a weighted graph G. Construct a new graph G by adding a weight of k to every edge of G. Do the edges of T form a minimum spanning tree of G. Prove the statement or give a counterexample.

(b) Let P = {s, . . . , t} describe a shortest weighted path between vertices s and t of a weighted graph G. Construct a new graph G by adding a weight of k to every edge of G. Does P describe a shortest path from s to t in G. Prove the statement or give a counterexample.

My solution:

a) Edges of T still form minimum spanning tree of G, since all edge weights are increased by same amount.

b) P still describes shortest path from s to t in G (same reason)

Can someone please verify the answers?

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closed as too localized by Blazemonger, Andy Hayden, jsumners, ρяσѕρєя K, Praveen Kumar Nov 19 '12 at 18:31

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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Although I don't think SO is the best place for your question, your answer is definitely wrong.

Consider a graph with 3 vertices (A,B,C), with the following edges:

A-B = 1
A-C = 0
C-B = 0

The shortest weighted path between A and B is A-C-B. If you add 2 to all the weights, your shortest path becomes A-B.

(Sorry, missed the first part of the question, there is an answer for that already by now. The reason why a is correct but b is wrong is that spanning trees always contain exactly n-1 edges, while the number of edges in a shortest weighted path may vary.)

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a) Correct. Because cost of every MST increases by (n-1)*k.

b) Wrong. Consider graph with 3 vertices and edges: 1-2: 3 2-3: 3 1-3: 10 Now shortest path from 1 do 3 goes through 2. Now add 10 to cost if every edge. Now the shortest path goes directly from 1 to 3.

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