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Of course this is an impossible statement in java (to-date), however ideally I would like to implement it as it is at the heart of many iterations. For example the first multiple times it is called I'm doing it 650,000+ times when it is creating the ArrayList. Unfortunately the reality is that my actual code does not have the set inside the else loop; thus it will pass over both the add and then the set commands and wasting time.

After that I have it also in another loop where it is only performing the set as the data is already created and this is multi-nested with in many others so it is a lengthy process.

ArrayList<Integer>  dataColLinker = new java.util.ArrayList<Integer>();
...
...
public void setLinkerAt( int value, int rowIndex) {
    ...
    while(rowIndex >= dataColLinker.size()) {
        dataColLinker.add(value);
    } else {
        dataColLinker.set(rowIndex, value);
    }

Any ideas or theories? I'm unsure about speeds in java when it comes to if statements and ArrayList commands and so on

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so you want to add the same value N times and then you want to change the rowIndex to value? –  Luiggi Mendoza May 28 '12 at 22:30
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3 Answers

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Am I missing something?

Doesn't this hypothetical code

while(rowIndex >= dataColLinker.size()) {
    dataColLinker.add(value);
} else {
    dataColLinker.set(rowIndex, value);
}

mean the same thing as this?

while(rowIndex >= dataColLinker.size()) {
    dataColLinker.add(value);
}
dataColLinker.set(rowIndex, value);

or this?

if (rowIndex >= dataColLinker.size()) {
    do {
        dataColLinker.add(value);
    } while(rowIndex >= dataColLinker.size());
} else {
    dataColLinker.set(rowIndex, value);
}

(The latter makes more sense ... I guess). Either way, it is obvious that you can rewrite the loop so that the "else test" is not repeated inside the loop ... as I have just done.


FWIW, this is most likely a case of premature optimization. That is, you are probably wasting your time optimizing code that doesn't need to be optimized:

  • For all you know, the JIT compiler's optimizer may have already moved the code around so that the "else" part is no longer in the loop.

  • Even if it hasn't, the chances are that the particular thing you are trying to optimize is not a significant bottleneck ... even if it might be executed 600,000 times.

My advice is to forget this problem for now. Get the program working. When it is working, decide if it runs fast enough. If it doesn't then profile it, and use the profiler output to decide where it is worth spending your time optimizing.

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..... ++++++!!!! –  Jay May 28 '12 at 22:36
    
@Stephen I think that in a language like Python the else block is executed only if the while condition is not initially met. I know this is Java, and we do not have that here, but this could be the origin of the question. –  Edwin Dalorzo May 28 '12 at 22:36
    
@Stephen, yes your first example is what I do have, but I want it to perform with less access as it will pass many times and here is passes through add and again through set. The second example looks like a good one, but I possible can know when I'm adding and changing the value, thus keeping it streamlines better... in to separate functions. I don't know a sparse array??? basically this col is part of my tableModel and identifies linked rows, do you possibly have a different idea on tackling it? –  xchiltonx May 28 '12 at 23:13
1  
@xchiltonx - I'm not going to advise you more on this because I suspect that you are wasting your time with premature optimization. See my updated answer. –  Stephen C May 28 '12 at 23:38
    
+1 for Stephen. Trying to optimize this is a waste of your time. If there's any ways to improve it, Java will find them itself. –  Louis Wasserman May 29 '12 at 7:01
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Wrap the "set" statement to mean "set if not set" and put it naked above the while loop.

You are correct, the language does not provide what you're looking for in exactly that syntax, but that's because there are programming paradigms like the one I just suggested so you don't need the syntax you are proposing.

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Stephen explained it better, thank you –  xchiltonx May 28 '12 at 23:18
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I don't see why there is a encapsulation of a while...

Use

//Use the appropriate start and end...
for(int rowIndex = 0, e = 65536; i < e; ++i){        
    if(rowIndex >= dataColLinker.size()) {
         dataColLinker.add(value);
     } else {
        dataColLinker.set(rowIndex, value);
     }    
}
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Based on the while - else statement, it should be a break as last sentence inside the else code block. –  Luiggi Mendoza May 28 '12 at 22:35
    
Based on the fact the original question had an else clause coupled to the while I will not attempt to argue this however you may very well be correct –  Jay May 28 '12 at 22:38
    
the number of elements is unknown –  xchiltonx May 28 '12 at 23:02
    
Not that that really matters... you could replace the i < e with some.hasNext() and get the same result I think... e.g. for(int i = 0; some.hasNext(); i = some.getNext())... but the answer above is probably correct anywho :P –  Jay May 29 '12 at 3:30
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