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I have Super class RECTANGLE with 2 variables and a Child class SQUARE with 1 variable. I am using class Square to inherit the getArea() method and overide it fine. Eclipse editor gives me an error in my SQUARE class, "super(width, length);". LENGTH variable has an error that can be fixed with making it static in the RECTANGLE class, that's not what I desire I guess. My homework requires that class SQUARE has a constructor with 1 variable to multiply by itself. What is the logical error in my code?

public class Rectangle 
{

double width, length;

Rectangle(double width, double length) 
{
    this.width = width;
    this.length = length;
}

double getArea() 
{
    double area = width * length;
    return area;
}   

void show() 
{
    System.out.println("Rectangle's width and length are: " + width + ", " + length);
    System.out.println("Rectangle's area is: " + getArea());
    System.out.println();
}
}


public class Square extends Rectangle
{
double width, length;

Square(double width) 
{
    super(width, length);
    this.width = width;
}

double getArea() 
{
    double area = width * width;
    return area;
}   

void show() 
{
    System.out.println("Square's width is: " + width) ;
    System.out.println("Square's area is: " + getArea());
}
}


public class ShapesAPP 
{

public static void main(String[] args) 
{
    Rectangle shape1 = new Rectangle(5, 2);
    Square shape2 = new Square(5);
    shape1.show( );
    shape2.show( );
}

}
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closed as too localized by bmargulies, Jarrod Roberson, Paul Bellora, pst, JoseK May 29 '12 at 10:18

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It should be:

Square(double width) 
{
    super(width, width);
    //this.width = width;
}

A Square is a rectangle with all sides of equal length.

You get the error because you're attempting to use length which wasn't yet initialized.

Also, you needn't have members width and length in Square. You already have them in the base class. So a better revised version would be:

public class Square extends Rectangle
{
    Square(double width) 
    {
        super(width, length);
    }

    double getArea() 
    {
        double area = width * width;
        return area;
    }  



    void show() 
    {
        System.out.println("Square's width is: " + width) ;
        System.out.println("Square's area is: " + getArea());
    }

}
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double width, length and this.width = width shouldn't be necessary inside Square - the former is inherited, the latter is taken care of by Rectangle's constructor. No? –  Amadan May 28 '12 at 23:20
    
@Amadan yes, pointed out. –  Luchian Grigore May 28 '12 at 23:20
    
Why does that work? I thought the super class rectangle has to keep the same variable names. –  bad boy May 28 '12 at 23:21
    
the local declaration of width is redundant and confusing as well; it hides the super class instance it doesn't over-ride it. –  Jarrod Roberson May 28 '12 at 23:22
2  
@badboy don't duplicate members. –  Luchian Grigore May 28 '12 at 23:22

You should have the constructor like this:

Square(double width) 
{
    super(width, width);
}

Also you should eliminate the following line in the Square class: double width, length;

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