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In Python, is it possible to get the object, say Foo, that contains another object, Bar, from within Bar itself? Here is an example of what I mean

class Foo(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.bar = Bar()
        self.text = "Hello World"

class Bar(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.newText = foo.text #This is what I want to do, 
                                #access the properties of the container object

foo = Foo()

Is this possible? Thanks!

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2  
You've got a typo; in Foo.__init__, self.bar = Foo() should be self.bar = Bar(). Otherwise you've got an infinite loop (in order to create a Foo, you first have to create a Foo). –  Hugh Bothwell May 28 '12 at 23:54
    
Thanks, Fixed! :) –  Michael McClenaghan May 29 '12 at 0:50

4 Answers 4

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Pass a reference to the Bar object, like so:

class Foo(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.text = "Hello World"  # has to be created first, so Bar.__init__ can reference it
        self.bar = Bar(self)

class Bar(object):
    def __init__(self, parent):
        self.parent = parent
        self.newText = parent.text

foo = Foo()

Edit: as pointed out by @thomleo, this can cause problems with garbage collection. The suggested solution is laid out at http://eli.thegreenplace.net/2009/06/12/safely-using-destructors-in-python/ and looks like

import weakref

class Foo(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.text = "Hello World"
        self.bar = Bar(self)

class Bar(object):
    def __init__(self, parent):
        self.parent = weakref.ref(parent)    # <= garbage-collector safe!
        self.newText = parent.text

foo = Foo()
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Thanks, this works. The only problem I can see with that is, when I am trying to access many objects up, I will be making a call to parent.parent.parent.etc. Is there a neater way of doing this? –  Michael McClenaghan May 29 '12 at 0:54
1  
If I am not mistaken, there is also a major issue with that. When you try to do del foo it won't necessarily destroy it as a reference to it still exists in the .parent attribute of the Bar it contains... –  thomleo Jun 5 '13 at 11:55
    
@MichaelMcClenaghan, in that case, you can just iterate up a number of times instead of manually spelling it out. Of course, that depends on the structure... –  batbrat Mar 28 at 11:40

is it possible to get the object, say Foo, that contains another object, Bar, from within Bar itself?

Not "automatically", because the language isn't built like that, and in particular, the language is built such that there is no way to guarantee that Foo exists.

That said, you can always do it explicitly. Attributes, like every other identifier in Python, are just names, not storage space for data; so nothing prevents you from letting the Bar instance have a manually assigned foo attribute that is a Foo instance, and vice-versa at the same time.

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class Foo(object):

    def __init__(self):
        self.text = "Hello World"
        self.bar = Bar()
        self.bar.text = self.text


class Bar(object):

    def __init__(self):
        self.text = None


foo = Foo()
print(foo.bar.text)
$ Hello World
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What about using inheritance:

class Bar(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.newText = self.text

class Foo(Bar):
    def __init__(self):
        self.txt = 'Hello World'
        Bar.__init__(self)

foo = Foo()
print foo.newText
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