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The below does not compile:

Func<int, int> fac = n => (n <= 1) ? 1 : n * fac(n - 1);

Local variable 'fac' might not be initialized before accessing

How can you make a recursive function with lambdas?

[Update]

Here are also two links that I found interesting to read:

  1. Eric Lippert's "Why does a recursive lambda cause a definite assignment error?"
  2. Anonymous Recursion in C#
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1  
Do you really want to? That looks like a nightmare for maintainability and understanding... –  Ian Jul 3 '09 at 12:36
    
well, maybe just a concept –  Andreas Grech Jul 3 '09 at 12:37

3 Answers 3

up vote 32 down vote accepted

This particular style of function is not supported by C# as a single line declaration. You have to separate out the declaration and definition into 2 lines

Func<int, int> fac = null;
fac = n => (n <= 1) ? 1 : n * fac(n - 1);
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Well geez, if you'd just typed "why does a recursive lambda cause a definite assignment error?" into some search engine, you'd have found the answer in my article on the subject.

:-)

http://blogs.msdn.com/ericlippert/archive/2006/08/18/why-does-a-recursive-lambda-cause-a-definite-assignment-error.aspx

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3  
All roads lead to Lippert :D excellent post. –  Andreas Grech Jul 3 '09 at 14:33
2  
+1 for 'if you'd just typed "why does a recursive lambda cause a definite assignment error?" into some search engine' :-) –  Doctor Jones Jul 3 '09 at 14:48

You'll have to create fac first und assign it later (which is pretty unfunctional because it depends on multiple assignment) or use so called Y-combinators.

Example:

    delegate Func<TIn, TOut> FixedPointFunction<TIn, TOut>(Func<TIn, TOut> f);

    static Func<T, TRes> Fix<T, TRes>(FixedPointFunction<T, TRes> f) {
        return f(x => Fix(f)(x));
    }

    static void Main(string[] args) {

        var fact = Fix<int, int>(f => x => (x <= 1) ? x : x * f(x - 1));

        Console.WriteLine(fact(5));            
    }

But note that this might be somewhat hard to read/understand.

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