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Given the matrix

test <- structure(list(X1 = c(3L, 0L, 3L, 1L, 2L, 2L, 1L, 2L, 2L, 3L), 
X2 = c(2L, 1L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L), X3 = c(0L, 
0L, 3L, 0L, 2L, 2L, 3L, 0L, 0L, 2L), X4 = c(1L, 1L, 1L, 0L, 
3L, 1L, 3L, 1L, 1L, 1L), X5 = c(3L, 3L, 1L, 3L, 1L, 3L, 2L, 
3L, 3L, 3L), X6 = c(3L, 3L, 3L, 3L, 3L, 3L, 3L, 3L, 3L, 3L
), X7 = c(2L, 2L, 2L, 3L, 2L, 2L, 3L, 2L, 2L, 2L), X8 = c(3L, 
0L, 1L, 0L, 1L, 1L, 3L, 0L, 0L, 1L), X9 = c(3L, 3L, 3L, 3L, 
3L, 3L, 3L, 3L, 3L, 3L)), .Names = c("X1", "X2", "X3", "X4", 
"X5", "X6", "X7", "X8", "X9"), row.names = c("1", "2", "3", "4", 
"5", "6", "7", "8", "9", "10"), class = "data.frame")

I'm trying to replace each instance of "1" by the sequence of numbers c(0,0,1), 2 by c(0,1,0), 3 by (1,0,1), and 0 by (0,0,0). Each value in the matrix should be replaced by one of these sequences of three binary values. The nrow of the resulting matrix should be nrow(test) * 3. Obviously I tried to use indexes test[test == 1] <- c(0,0,1) but this returns error rhs is the wrong length for indexing by a logical matrix. The replace function also doesn't seem to work here, returning the same error message. Any idea?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Since the dimension of the result is different (a 3-dimensional array instead of a 2-dimensional matrix), you cannot just replace the elements one by one.

You can use apply: if is often used to apply a function to each column or row of a matrix, but we can also use it to apply a function to each element.

apply( 
  test, 
  1:2, 
  function(u) list(c(0,0,0), c(0,0,1), c(0,1,0), c(1,0,1))[[u+1]] 
)
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1  
+1 for showing that apply can be used across different margins simultaneously. It's news to me! –  thelatemail May 29 '12 at 1:28
    
I, too. thought this was très elegant, but since I did know that apply was n-dimensional, I was most impressed with the slick selection from a vector aspect. –  BondedDust Jan 11 at 18:00

You can do this:

Z <- matrix(c(0, 1, 0, 0,
              0, 0, 1, 0,
              0, 0, 0, 1), nrow = 3)

sapply(test, function(i)Z[,i+1])
#      X1 X2 X3 X4 X5 X6 X7 X8 X9
# [1,]  0  1  0  0  0  0  1  0  0
# [2,]  0  0  1  0  0  0  0  0  0
# [3,]  1  0  0  0  1  1  0  1  1
# ...
# [28,]  0  1  1  0  0  0  1  0  0
# [29,]  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0
# [30,]  1  0  0  0  1  1  0  0  1
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You can expand using switch:

matrix( sapply( c(1+data.matrix(test)), 
                    switch, c(0,0,0), c(0,0,1), c(0,1,0), c(1,0,1)) , 
        nrow=nrow(test)*3 ) 
      [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5] [,6] [,7] [,8] [,9]
 [1,]    1    0    0    0    1    1    0    1    1
 [2,]    0    1    0    0    0    0    1    0    0
 [3,]    1    0    0    1    1    1    0    1    1
 [4,]    0    0    0    0    1    1    0    0    1
 [5,]    0    0    0    0    0    0    1    0    0
 [6,]    0    1    0    1    1    1    0    0    1
 snipped remaining rows


str( matrix( sapply( c(1+data.matrix(test)), 
                    switch, c(0,0,0), c(0,0,1), c(0,1,0), c(1,0,1)) , 
        nrow=nrow(test)*3 ) )
  num [1:30, 1:9] 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 ...
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