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Will deleteing a pointer to the struct foo:

struct foo
{
    bar * baz;
};

Pointing to struct baz:

struct baz
{
    int arr;
};

Also delete/ free the memory pointed to by baz?

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1  
Along with the destructor, you should follow the rule of three/five and implement a copy/move constructor and assignment operator as well. – chris May 29 '12 at 0:28
    
Haven't learned about copy constructors as much yet. It's for a DS class, so we're not getting too far into the language itself. – Flexo1515 May 29 '12 at 0:36
1  
If it did, that would be a disaster. What if something else was using struct baz?! – David Schwartz May 29 '12 at 0:39
    
Yeah, that was precisely my fear – Flexo1515 May 29 '12 at 0:40

No. Deletes do not "cascade" in this way.

However, if you have a destructor for foo, then you could delete baz within that destructor.

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No. You would either need to manually delete baz before deleting the instance of foo. Most typical developers would have the destructor of foo delete baz.

struct foo
{
    bar * baz;
    ~foo()
    {
        delete baz;
    }
};
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2  
Or better yet, if baz is created in the constructor and deleted in the destructor, it probably shouldn't be separately allocated. (Or otherwise, use a smart pointer.) – Steven Burnap May 29 '12 at 0:29
    
K, thank you. I have several tables pointing to the same data, so I wanted to make sure deconstructing one table wouldn't affect the actual data. – Flexo1515 May 29 '12 at 0:37

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