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Say I have the following code (please assume all the appropriate import statements):

public class CTestClass {

    // Properties
    protected Object LockObj;
    public ConcurrentDictionary<String, String> Prop_1;
    protected System.Timers.Timer TImer_1;

    // Methods

    public CTestClass () {
        LockObj = new Object ();
        Prop_1 = new ConcurrentDictionary<String, String> ();
        Prop_1.TryAdd ("Key_1", "Value_1");
        Timer_1 = new System.Timers.Timer ();
        Timer_1.Interval = (1000 * 60); // One minute
        Timer_1.Elapsed += new ElapsedEventHandler ((s, t) => Method_2 ());
        Timer_1.Enabled = true;
    } // End CTestClass ()

    public void Method_1 () {
        // Do something that requires Prop_1 to be read
        // But *__do not__* lock Prop_1
    } // End Method_1 ()

    public void Method_2 () {
        lock (LockObj) {
            // Do something with Prop_1 *__only if__* Method_1 () is not currently executing
        }
    } // End Method_2 ()

} // End CTestClass

// Main class
public class Program {

    public static void Main (string[] Args) {
        CTestClass TC = new CTestClass ();
        ParallelEnumerable.Range (0, 10)
            .ForAll (s => {
                TC.Method_1 ();
            });
    }

}

I understand it is possible to use MethodBase.GetCurrentMethod, but (short of doing messy book-keeping with global variables) is it possible to solve the problem without reflection?

Thanks in advance for your assistance.

EDIT

(a) Corrected an error with the scope of LockObj

(b) Adding a bit more by way of explanation (taken from my comment below)

I have corrected my code (in my actual project) and placed LockObj as a class property. The trouble is, Method_2 is actually fired by a System.Timers.Timer, and when it is ready to fire, it is quite possible that Method_1 is already executing. But in that event it is important to wait for Method_1 to finish executing before proceeding with Method_2.

I agree that the minimum working example I have tried to create does not make this latter point clear. Let me see if I can edit the MWE.

CODE EDITING FINISHED

ONE FINAL EDIT

I am using Visual Studio 2010 and .NET 4.0, so I do not have the async/await features that would have made my life a lot easier.

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1  
Sounds like you should read about Semaphores and Mutex's. It's similar to lock, except you have more control over it. And why are you locking a local variable?! Read more about the subject at MSDN –  Yorye Nathan May 29 '12 at 3:49
    
I don't know how you could do this with no reflection without perhaps setting a flag stating that it is in progress and then having it unset the flag once it is completed. Maybe I'm misunderstanding.. –  Chaos May 29 '12 at 4:08
    
I'm new to ParallelEnumerable, so maybe this is a stupid question, but why are you locking on a local variable? –  Francesco Baruchelli May 29 '12 at 4:48
    
Thanks for pointing out the error with the scope of LockObj. I have corrected it now. Please see the question for more information. –  Shredderroy May 29 '12 at 5:22

4 Answers 4

As pointed above, you should become more familiar with different synchronization primitives, that exist in .net.
You dont solve such problems by reflection or analyzing whos the concurent - running method, but by using a signaling primitive, which will inform anyone interested that the method is running/ended.

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Provide example for becoming a great answer. –  Yorye Nathan May 29 '12 at 4:36
    
I think he needs to elabore abit more on his goals, it seems like he is workign on a standart producer-consuemr, but i cannot be sure from his sample.. –  YavgenyP May 29 '12 at 5:41

First of all ConcurentDictionary is thread safe so you don't need to lock for producing/consuming. So, if only care about accessing your dictionary no additional locking is necessary. However if you just need to mutual exclude the execution of method 1 and 2, you should declare the lock object as class member and you may lock each function body using it, but as I said, not needed if you are going to use ConcurentDictionary. If you really need which method executes at every moment you can use stack frame of each thread, but this will going to be slow and I believe not necessary for this case.

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I have corrected my code (in my actual project) and placed LockObj as a class property. The trouble is, Method_2 is actually fired by a System.Timers.Timer, and when it is ready to fire, it is quite possible that Method_1 is already executing. But in that event it is important to wait for Method_1 to finish executing before proceeding with Method_2. –  Shredderroy May 29 '12 at 5:19
    
To achieve that you need to lock the body of Method_1 with the same sync object (LockObj), so if when timer fires if the Method_1 is running Method_2 will be locked until you go outside of the lock in Method_1 –  Sorin Mischie May 29 '12 at 5:37

The term you're looking for is Thread Synchronisation. There are many ways to achieve this in .NET.
One of which (lock) you've discovered.

In general terms, the lock object should be accessible by all threads needing it, and initialised before any thread tries to lock it.

The lock() syntax ensures that only one thread can continue at a time for that lock object. Any other threads which try to lock that same object will halt until they can obtain the lock.

There is no ability to time out or otherwise cancel the waiting for the lock (except by terminating the thread or process).

By way of example, here's a simpler form:

public class ThreadSafeCounter
{
    private object _lockObject = new Object();  // Initialise once
    private int count = 0; 
    public void Increment()
    {
        lock(_lockObject) // Only one thread touches count at a time
        { 
            count++; 
        }
    } 
    public void Decrement()
    {
        lock (_lockObject) // Only one thread touches count at a time
        {
            count--; 
        }
    } 
    public int Read()
    {
        lock (_lockObject) // Only one thread touches count at a time
        {
            return count; 
        }
    }
}
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You can see this as a sort of variant of the classic readers/writers problem where the readers don't consume the product of the writers. I think you can do it with the help of an int variable and three Mutex.

One Mutex (mtxExecutingMeth2) guard the execution of Method2 and blocks the execution of both Method2 and Method1. Method1 must release it immediately, since otherwise you could not have other parallel executions of Method1. But this means that you have to tell Method2 whene there are Method1's executing, and this is done using the mtxThereAreMeth1 Mutex which is released only when there are no more Method1's executing. This is controlled by the value of numMeth1 which has to be protected by another Mutex (mtxNumMeth1).

I didn't give it a try, so I hope I didn't introduce some race conditions. Anyway it should at least give you an idea of a possible direction to follow.

And this is the code:

protected int numMeth1 = 0;
protected Mutex mtxNumMeth1 = new Mutex();
protected Mutex mtxExecutingMeth2 = new Mutex();
protected Mutex mtxThereAreMeth1 = new Mutex();


public void Method_1() 
{
    // if this is the first execution of Method1, tells Method2 that it has to wait
    mtxNumMeth1.WaitOne();
    if (numMeth1 == 0)
        mtxThereAreMeth1.WaitOne();
    numMeth1++;
    mtxNumMeth1.ReleaseMutex();
    // check if Method2 is executing and release the Mutex immediately in order to avoid 
    // blocking other Method1's
    mtxExecutingMeth2.WaitOne();
    mtxExecutingMeth2.ReleaseMutex();

    // Do something that requires Prop_1 to be read
    // But *__do not__* lock Prop_1

    // if this is the last Method1 executing, tells Method2 that it can execute
    mtxNumMeth1.WaitOne();
    numMeth1--;
    if (numMeth1 == 0)
        mtxThereAreMeth1.ReleaseMutex();
    mtxNumMeth1.ReleaseMutex();
} 

public void Method_2() 
{
    mtxThereAreMeth1.WaitOne();
    mtxExecutingMeth2.WaitOne();

    // Do something with Prop_1 *__only if__* Method_1 () is not currently executing

    mtxExecutingMeth2.ReleaseMutex();
    mtxThereAreMeth1.ReleaseMutex();
} 
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