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I am new to the world of java and threads..I was just going through an example code as below:-

package com.alice.learnthread;

class NewThread implements Runnable{
Thread t;
long clicker=0;

private volatile boolean running=true;
NewThread(int p){
    t=new Thread(this);
    t.setPriority(p);
}
public void run(){
    while(running){
        clicker++;
    }
}
public void stop(){
    running=false;
}
public void start(){
    t.start();
}

}

 public class TestThread {
public static void main(String[] args){
    Thread r=Thread.currentThread();
    r.setPriority(Thread.MAX_PRIORITY);
    NewThread hi=new NewThread(Thread.NORM_PRIORITY+2);
    NewThread lo=new NewThread(Thread.NORM_PRIORITY-2);
    hi.start();
    lo.start();
    try{
        r.sleep(5000);
    }catch(InterruptedException e){
        System.out.println("caught");
    }
    hi.stop();
    lo.stop();
    try{
        hi.t.join();
        lo.t.join();
    }catch(InterruptedException e){
        System.out.println("cau1");
    }
    System.out.println("hi = "+hi.clicker+" lo="+lo.clicker);
}

}

However according to the output in the book the thread with high priority should have higher value for the variable clicker. But in my case the values for the variable clicker is much higher for the lower priority thread than for the higher priority one.The output is like below for me:-

hi = 2198713135 lo=2484053552

Does this not mean that lower priority thread got more CPU time than the higher priority one...Am i missing something..The results are the same(higher clicker value for the lower priority thread) on both ubuntu and win7...

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3  
With 2 threads each one probably got its own CPU core and there was never any contention that would involve priorities. I would guess that if you had, say, 10 threads you might see the expected behavior. But even then, the Java thread scheduler is more cooperative than preemptive, so without explicit yield() calls you might still get "interesting" results. –  Jim Garrison May 29 '12 at 3:59
    
Adding to the above, the answer to your question "Does this not mean that lower priority thread got more CPU time than the higher priority one..." is.. no. –  Heshan Perera May 29 '12 at 4:06
    
@Heshan then what does that mean? –  Rasmus May 29 '12 at 4:23
    
Ok, by saying "Does this not mean that lower priority thread got more CPU time than the higher priority one..." I assumed you meant that in a competition between the two threads, for CPU time of a single CPU, the one with lower priority thread got more CPU time. To which my answer is no. This is most probably a case where the two threads were split between two independent processing units (such as cores), or it is a highly unusual case as cafeaulait.org/course/week11/32.html states. –  Heshan Perera May 29 '12 at 4:32
    
Anyway, the above test is not a good way to test the principles of thread scheduling. Since there are too many factors external to your program that could affect the scheduling of your threads. –  Heshan Perera May 29 '12 at 4:35

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

As sul said, priority is more a hint than a contract to the JVM. In your case, your result can be explained by several theories:

  • The second thread runs faster because it takes the benefits of the compilation of the first one and is stopped after the first one.
  • The facts that the while loop check the value of a volatile variable force the jvm to actualize the value and during this time could give the other thread the CPU.
  • The stop methods takes lot of time to stop the thread.

That is just some facts to say that how thread act is unpredictable. For example try to start the low priority thread first and I am sure you will have a different result.

Also, try this :

public class TestThread
{
    public static void main(String[] args){
        Thread r=Thread.currentThread();
        r.setPriority(Thread.MAX_PRIORITY);
        NewThread hi=new NewThread(Thread.MAX_PRIORITY);
        NewThread lo=new NewThread(Thread.MIN_PRIORITY);
        hi.start();
        lo.start();
        try{
            r.sleep(5000);
        }catch(InterruptedException e){
            System.out.println("caught");
        }
        hi.interrupt();
        lo.interrupt();

        System.out.println("hi="+hi.clicker);
        System.out.println("lo="+lo.clicker);
    }
}
class NewThread extends Thread{
    long clicker=0;

    NewThread(int p){
        setPriority(p);
    }
    public void run(){
        while(true){
            clicker++;
        }
    }
}

I am sure that removing the volatile variable and changing how the thread is stopped will give you an other result.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for that clear explanation –  Rasmus May 29 '12 at 5:38
    
One other change you should have is to have the while loop on !isInterupted() rather than true. –  Michael Rutherfurd May 29 '12 at 6:26

Thread priority in Java does not guarantee the intended behavior. It is just like a hint to the JVM. The actual behavior depends on the underlying OS.

Also, read this nice little para about Cooperative vs. Preemptive Threading: http://www.cafeaulait.org/course/week11/32.html

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Threads are unpredictable in nature. The low priority thread run when high priority threads are not able to run due to some reasons, and moreover Thread priority isn't very meaningful when all threads are competing for CPU.

But yet when i executed the program above, i got the desired result as mention in your book.

hi = 1707497920 lo=1699648942

hi = 1702682202 lo=1685457297
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I am finding on Windows 7 that if I increase the number of threads to the point where there is an actual fight over system resources, and increase the running time, the higher priority threads do an order of magnitude more clicks. Would be curious if this is not the case. I think your test case is too small both in number of threads to use up enough resources that they have to contend, and also in running time for JVM to bind to native threads.

   public static void main(String[] args) {
        Thread r = Thread.currentThread();
        r.setPriority(Thread.MAX_PRIORITY);
        List<NewThread> hiThreads = new LinkedList<NewThread>();
        List<NewThread> lowThreads = new LinkedList<NewThread>();
        for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
            NewThread hi = new NewThread(Thread.NORM_PRIORITY + 2);
            NewThread lo = new NewThread(Thread.NORM_PRIORITY - 2);
            hiThreads.add(hi);
            lowThreads.add(lo);
            hi.start();
            lo.start();
        }
        try {
            r.sleep(30000);
        } catch (InterruptedException e) {
            System.out.println("caught");
        }
        for (NewThread h : hiThreads) {
            h.stop();
        }
        for (NewThread l : lowThreads) {
            l.stop();
        }
        try {
            for (NewThread h : hiThreads) {
                h.t.join();
            }
            for (NewThread l : lowThreads) {
                l.t.join();
            }
        } catch (InterruptedException e) {
            System.out.println("cau1");
        }
        long hiClicker = 0l;
        for (NewThread h : hiThreads) {
            hiClicker += h.clicker;
        }
        long lowClicker = 0l;
        for (NewThread l : lowThreads) {
            lowClicker += l.clicker;
        }
        System.out.println("hi = " + hiClicker + " lo=" + lowClicker);
    }
share|improve this answer

I wrote a small application to see how Java threads work at:

https://github.com/vinhqdang/java-thread-example

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