Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have some board numpy arrays like that:

array([[0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0],
       [1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 1],
       [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1],
       [0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0],
       [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1],
       [0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0],
       [0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0],
       [1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0]])

And I'm using the following code to find the sum of elements on each nth diagonal from -7 to 8 of the board (and the mirrored version of it).

n = 8
rate = [b.diagonal(i).sum()
        for b in (board, board[::-1])
        for i in range(-n+1, n)]

After some profiling, this operation is taking about 2/3 of overall running time and it seems to be because of 2 factors:

  • The .diagonal method builds a new array instead of a view (looks like numpy 1.7 will have a new .diag method to solve that)
  • The iteration is done in python inside the list comprehension

So, there are any methods to find these sums faster (possibly in the C layer of numpy)?


After some more tests, I could reduce 7.5x the total time by caching this operation... Maybe I was looking for the wrong bottleneck?


One more thing:

Just found the .trace method that replaces the diagonal(i).sum() thing and... There wasn't much improvement in performance (about 2 to 4%).

So the problem should be the comprehension. Any ideas?

share|improve this question
    
Caching is the right way of your problem. But for the real bottlenect, I think is the python language. If you really want better performance for this operation, you need C. – Mayli May 29 '12 at 6:00
    
@Mayli Caching solved part of the problem. The profiling still says this is the most expensive calculation... – JBernardo May 29 '12 at 6:14
    
Rewrite the hotspot in C will always bring some performance, isn't? – Mayli May 29 '12 at 6:30
    
@Mayli Only if nothing else works. I'm still trying – JBernardo May 29 '12 at 6:40
    
Calculation needs time. So you should try avoid them. – Kabie May 29 '12 at 7:44
up vote 6 down vote accepted

There's a possible solution using stride_tricks. This is based in part on the plethora of information available in the answers to this question, but the problem is just different enough, I think, not to count as a duplicate.

>>> rows = 8
>>> cols = 8
>>> a = numpy.arange(rows * cols).reshape((rows, cols))
>>> fill = numpy.zeros((rows - 1) * cols, dtype='i8').reshape((rows - 1, cols))
>>> stacked = numpy.vstack((a, fill, a))
>>> major_stride, minor_stride = stacked.strides
>>> strides = major_stride, minor_stride * (cols + 1)
>>> shape = (cols * 2 - 1, cols)
>>> numpy.lib.stride_tricks.as_strided(stacked, shape, strides)
array([[ 0,  9, 18, 27, 36, 45, 54, 63],
       [ 8, 17, 26, 35, 44, 53, 62,  0],
       [16, 25, 34, 43, 52, 61,  0,  0],
       [24, 33, 42, 51, 60,  0,  0,  0],
       [32, 41, 50, 59,  0,  0,  0,  0],
       [40, 49, 58,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0],
       [48, 57,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0],
       [56,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0],
       [ 0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  7],
       [ 0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  6, 15],
       [ 0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  5, 14, 23],
       [ 0,  0,  0,  0,  4, 13, 22, 31],
       [ 0,  0,  0,  3, 12, 21, 30, 39],
       [ 0,  0,  2, 11, 20, 29, 38, 47],
       [ 0,  1, 10, 19, 28, 37, 46, 55]])
>>> diags = numpy.lib.stride_tricks.as_strided(stacked, shape, strides)
>>> diags.sum(axis=1)
array([252, 245, 231, 210, 182, 147, 105,  56,   7,  21,  42,  70, 105,
       147, 196])

Of course, I have no idea how fast this will actually be. But I bet it will be faster than a Python list comprehension. For convenience, here's a diagonals function:

def diagonals(a):
    rows, cols = a.shape
    if cols > rows:
        a = a.T
        rows, cols = a.shape
    fill = numpy.zeros(((cols - 1), cols), dtype=a.dtype)
    stacked = numpy.vstack((a, fill, a))
    major_stride, minor_stride = stacked.strides
    strides = major_stride, minor_stride * (cols + 1)
    shape = (rows + cols - 1, cols)
    return numpy.lib.stride_tricks.as_strided(stacked, shape, strides)
share|improve this answer
    
This is faster than the .trace method! – JBernardo May 30 '12 at 1:10
    
Actually, I can discard the diagonals -7 and 7 from each board because they do not affect the result. But even with them, this method (and a dot product dot(ones(8), diagonals(board).T)), I can make the sum 10 to 15% faster. – JBernardo May 30 '12 at 1:11
    
I edited diagonals to make it fully general; it should work correctly on all 2-d arrays. – senderle May 30 '12 at 12:30
    
Thanks. I only have square matrices of the same size. So I also use the same fill array instead of creating one at each iteration. This function is called about 100K times in 2 or 3 seconds. – JBernardo May 30 '12 at 18:16
1  
BTW, the reshape operation could be replaced by: numpy.zeros(((cols - 1), cols), ...) – JBernardo May 30 '12 at 18:16

As I posted in a comment, I wouldn't go into C code.

Try to go with PyPy. Actually it's numpy support is quiet good (however it not support directly array.diagonal) - I didn't check if there is other buidin method for that. Nerveless, I tried the following code:

try:
    import numpypy  # required by PyPy
except ImportError:
    pass
import numpy

board = numpy.array([[0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0],
       [1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 1],
       [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1],
       [0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0],
       [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1],
       [0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0],
       [0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0],
       [1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0]])

n=len(board)
def diag_sum(i, b):
    s = 0
    if i>=0:
        row = 0
        end = n
    else:
        row = -i
        end = n+i
        i = 0
    while i<end:
        s += b[row, i]
        i+=1
        row+=1
    return s


import time
t=time.time()
for i in xrange(50000):
    # rate = [b.diagonal(i).sum()
    #         for b in (board, board[::-1])
    #         for i in range(-n+1, n)]

    rate = [diag_sum(i,b)
            for b in (board, board[::-1])
            for i in range(-n+1, n)]

print time.time() - t

The results are:

  • 0.64s PyPy with diag_sum
  • 6.01s CPython version with diag_sum
  • 5.60s CPython version with b.diagonal
share|improve this answer
1  
I already tried pypy but the numpypy module lacks lots of things I need... – JBernardo May 29 '12 at 15:22
    
Did you try the version from trunk? With PyPy you are calling normal numpy, you normally shouldn't use numpypy more then import it before numpy. But stay in touch since numpy support is under active development in PyPy – Robert Zaremba May 29 '12 at 19:52

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.