Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Does this smell?
I have a few properties you can only set once. They can be set at any time during the objects existence and can not be undone.
I implement then like this.

    private FooThingy _foo;
    public FooThingy Foo
    {
        set { if (null == _foo) _foo = value; }
        get { return _foo; }
    }

But I don't like it. I feel like I have missed something. Have I?

Edit: Why I don't have it in the constructor.
I cant go into the details but setting this results in <bad analogy> Melting the wax statue </bad analogy>. And I don't want my constructor to create already melted objects.

share|improve this question
2  
An unrelated problem with that code is that it silently fails, you probably want to raise an exception or something if someone tries to re-set a property and then fails because it's already set. –  Pablo Jul 3 '09 at 13:36
1  
An example of this kind of property would be a bool prop called "Zombie". It starts false, but if it is ever set to true, then the object is now undead and will be undead forever; you can't change it back. This is handy when the functionality of an object is based on the existence of some external service provider which can be permanently destroyed. –  Eric Lippert Jul 3 '09 at 14:17
1  
I would not say that this is necessarily a BAD practice but it is definitely weird. I believe that a class should model something in your business domain, and that properties should be directly analogous to properties of the real-world business domain thing being modeled. If the real-world thing has the feature that one of its properties can be changed only once then model it that way. But frankly, without knowing more about your situation, it's hard to say whether this is a mechanism masquerading as part of the model. –  Eric Lippert Jul 3 '09 at 14:20
1  
Sure. Some lines of code are about representing something in the business domain. For example, "class Manager : Employee" -- a manager is a kind of employee. A manager has an unordered set of employees who report to them: "public HashSet<Employee> Reports { get ..." The "HashSet" part is a mechanism. There's no such thing as a "hashset" at your company! No one asks a manager whether Bob has been transferred to their hashset yet. Mixing model code with mechanism code is often inevitable, but when you do it unnecessarily it can indicate a bad code smell. –  Eric Lippert Jul 3 '09 at 15:24
2  
I don't know if this will help,but I have done this. The reason for it was...convoluted. I changed it. And now I'm better. –  Ray Jul 3 '09 at 18:11

8 Answers 8

up vote 18 down vote accepted

Set-once-properties violate the principle of least surprise - a caller expects that when a property can be set once, it can be set again. (barring range and compatibility checks, of course - but they are bound to specific values or value combinations).

Initialize them in the constructor.
Alternatively, if they are to many / to complex to write all constructors, use a factory/builder class:

ThingieBuilder tb = new ThingieBuilder();
tb.FooThingy = 17.23;   // r/w properties
tb.BarThingy = 42;
tb.UseExtendedThingamagicAdapter = true;
Thingie t = tb.Create();
if (t.Bar==42) // r/o property
  ...

Or, separate the settings in a configuration object, that can be replaced or passed during construction.

share|improve this answer
1  
"principle of least surprise" - what a good name. –  Nifle Jul 3 '09 at 13:31
    
The name is not original. I believe I first heard it in the context of the Macintosh UI (which means it's probably from Xerox). It meant, given a choice of two actions to take based on a given user input, choose the action that will be least surprising to the user. –  John Saunders Jul 26 '09 at 18:36
    
Absolutely, it's not my words. I don't know where I found it the first time, but I consider it as one of the few fundamental principles - of the same quality of mathematical axioms - from which many rules derive: naming conventions, patterns, one task per entity etc. –  peterchen Jul 26 '09 at 18:56

I think the design would be more clear to the caller if such values are passed to the constructor, and exposed as read-only properties instead. If the value can't be set at construction time, perhaps it could be appropriate to throw an exception if trying to set the value again:

private FooThingy _foo;
public FooThingy Foo
{
    set 
    { 
        if (null == _foo) { _foo = value; }
        else  { throw new WhatEverThatFitsException(); }
    }
    get { return _foo; }
}

Just to be very clear: I do not in any way promote the use of set-once properties; the code sample only show the approach that I might use, should the value not be available at construction time of the object for whatever reason. That said; I have never come across that situation in any of the projects I have been involved in.

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah this is probably the best-practise way –  James Jul 3 '09 at 13:19
    
hmmm.... designers and many tools probably will complain if you don't even let them set the same value twice. –  peterchen Jul 3 '09 at 13:20
    
also, I doubt that set-once properties are a good idea at all –  peterchen Jul 3 '09 at 13:22
    
@peterchen: agreed; I would strongly vote for assignment through constructor and exposure through read-only property for the reasons you mention (which is why I suggest that first in my answer). –  Fredrik Mörk Jul 3 '09 at 13:26
1  
The System.Threading.Thread.Name property is a write-once property. Not endorsing the concept...just thought it was interesting the framework has just such an example. –  Matt Davis Oct 23 '12 at 3:48

I would suggest setting them on construction, and therefore making the setters private. That seems like a more sensible way.

If you are going to do it that way, throw some sort of Exception. At least let the developer know you didn't set their values rather than ignoring it silently.

share|improve this answer

if FooThingy is a value object like an int it will be 0 initialized instead of null. For the rest it looks okay

share|improve this answer

It's hard to tell from this toy example, but it sounds like _foo is relatively important to the existence of this object. In that case, it should almost certainly be a readonly property which is initialized at creation time, and not have any public setter. Favor immutable objects wherever possible; it makes your life much simpler!

share|improve this answer
    
It can be useful to have variables which can change if and only if they are null. For example, an item's next pointer on an append-only linked list can't be set until the following item is created, but a guarantee that next will never change if it's non-null can be very useful. –  supercat Nov 20 '12 at 18:34

I agree with Fredrik, readonly would make more sense. This way you could only declare your variable in the constructor (or as part of the declaration). I think doing what your doing isnt instantly clear that this is what you want to achieve.

Check out this MSDN page.

share|improve this answer

Make them readonly and set them in the constructor.

share|improve this answer

Just make the setters methods and not properties - and the disconnect between expectation and behavior goes away. The method is free to throw an InvalidOperationException - but it's unexpected to have a property setter do it.

private FooThingy _foo;
public FooThingy Foo
{
    get { return _foo; }
}

public void SetFooThingy(FooThingy value) {
   if (Foo != null) 
      throw new InvalidOperationException("Foo is already set!");
   _foo = value;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I'd suggest bool TrySetFooThingie(FooThingy value), and having it use CompareExchange. In most situations, the possibility that a variable may have been previously is not really exceptional; in some lazy-initialization cases, it may not even require any special handling (simply try to set it to the new value, and--whether or not that succeeded--use whatever value it contains). –  supercat Nov 20 '12 at 18:32
    
@supercat - well sure, most properties don't fall under the exceptional case of only being allowed to set once. But, this one does. TrySet is usually a pattern for an unsure if-valid condition (such as parsing unknown input). If you don't know whether you set a property or not before (though I find that an odd scenario to contemplate) you can easily check the value of Foo to determine that. IMO, TrySet instead of an exception for semantically incorrect statements (such as trying to set Foo twice) just harkens back to return codes that no one bothers checking. –  Mark Brackett Nov 20 '12 at 20:35
    
The usage scenarios I envision for a set-once characteristic would be things like lazy initialization or thread-safe append-only lists. For lazy initialization, code should try to set a value if it hasn't been set, but if someone else makes a similar attempt at the same time it doesn't matter--just use the later instance. For an append-only collection, if one thread tries to store data in the "next" spot but another thread puts data there first, the former thread should be prepared to store data in the new "next" spot. In both of these scenarios, it may be worthwhile to test for null... –  supercat Nov 20 '12 at 21:49
    
...before doing the CompareExchange (since that method can be a bit slow, and there's no reason to burden the common case with it) but doing a "conventional" test and then a "normal" assignment would create a race condition that can be avoided with CompareExchange. One could have an exception-throwing version of the SetXX method for use by calling code that expects to be the only code that sets XX and isn't prepared to deal with the possibility that it isn't, but I don't see as many uses for that as I see for TrySet methods. –  supercat Nov 20 '12 at 21:56

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.