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I have a string in the format Tue May 22 2012 11.00 pm . Now i need to convert this into NSDate and then get the current Date and time form NSDate *currentDate = [NSDate today];.

Then find the time difference in Seconds between the 2.

I am unable to solve this, help me please

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1  
If it's local time, you can't. For example, on the day we set our clocks back an hour, there are some times that repeat twice. At minimum, you also need to know whether the time specified is daylight time or standard time. –  David Schwartz May 29 '12 at 7:35

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I have a string in the format Tue May 22 2012 11.00 pm . Now i need to convert this into NSDate

Ok for this part you need an `NSDateFormatter``

NSDateFormatter *df = [[NSDateFormatter alloc] init];
[df setDateFormat:@"EEE MM dd yyyy hh.mm a"];
NSDate *dateFromString =[df dateFromString:yourString];

This was the first part.

Now for the

Then find the time difference in Seconds between the 2.

NSTimeIntervall diffInSeconds = [dateFromString timeIntervalSinceNow];

This will calculate the seconds between the dateFromStringand now.

For mor information about working with date and time in cocoa I highly recomment Ole Begemenans "Working with Date and Time in Cocoa Series"

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I tried this NSDate *dateFromString =[df dateFromString:@"Mon May 21 2012 11.00 pm"]; but the output i get is Mon 12 26 2011 11.00 PM. Incorrect date gets displayed. –  sharon Hwk May 29 '12 at 8:24
    
NSDateFormatter *df = [[NSDateFormatter alloc] init]; [df setDateFormat:@"EEE MM dd YYYY hh.mm a"]; df.timeZone = [NSTimeZone timeZoneForSecondsFromGMT:0]; NSDate *dateFromString =[df dateFromString:@"Mon May 21 2012 11.00 pm"]; NSTimeInterval diffInSeconds = [dateFromString timeIntervalSinceNow]; NSLog(@"%@", [df stringFromDate:dateFromString]); My code –  sharon Hwk May 29 '12 at 8:49
    
2011-12-26 23:00:00 +0000 I get a 2011 date. But what i entered in the String is a 2012 date –  sharon Hwk May 29 '12 at 8:56
    
2011-12-26 23:00:00 +0000 same as before. –  sharon Hwk May 29 '12 at 9:04
    
I think this works EEE MMM dd yyyy hh.mm a. Make the YYYY in lower case. –  sharon Hwk May 29 '12 at 9:06

Use NSDateFormatter to turn your string date Tue May 22 2012 11.00 pm to an NSDate. You will also need to set the timezone of your string date in your nsdateformatter.

Example:

    NSDateFormatter * frmt;
    frmt = [[NSDateFormatter alloc] init];
    frmt.dateFormat = @"yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss";
    frmt.timeZone = [NSTimeZone timeZoneForSecondsFromGMT:0];

You will need to use the dateFormat that correspond to your string.

Then you get your nsdate using

[frmt dateFromString:(NSString *)dateString]

then you can compare the two NSDate using -timeIntervalSinceDate

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Convert both to time_t (probably with mktime) then subtract. In theory you should use difftime to compute the difference, but in reality time_t on most typical systems (almost certainly including MacOS) is an integer number of seconds since an epoch (Midnight January 1, 1970 for POSIX), so subtraction works fine.

There are, of course, a few wrinkles from daylight savings time, some of which create unresolvable ambiguities.

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The general answer is: If at all possible, realize that you've painted yourself into a corner and change the design so that you don't have this problem in the first place. –  David Schwartz May 29 '12 at 7:38
    
@DavidSchwartz: yes, generally. As I'm sure you already know, there really isn't any way to get an answer that's guaranteed correct, at least for most local times, so that's about as good as it gets. –  Jerry Coffin May 29 '12 at 7:39

-dateFromString: method of NSDateFormatter class should help.

Then -timeIntervalSinceNow of NSDate gives the time interval. You don't need intermediate step [NSDate today].

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