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Using MSVC 2010, I get the following behaviour:

template <class T> class Boogy
{
public:
    void Fn( T in )
    {
    }

    void Fn2( const T& in)
    {
    }
};

template <> void Boogy<int>::Fn( int in ) //builds ok
{
}

template <> void Boogy<int*>::Fn( int* in ) //builds ok
{
}

template <> void Boogy<int>::Fn2( const int& in ) //builds ok
{
}

template <> void Boogy<int*>::Fn2( const int*& in ) //DOES NOT BUILD
{
}

typedef int* intStar;
template <> void Boogy<intStar>::Fn2( const intStar& in ) //builds ok
{
}

Obviously, I've come up with a 'hack' to sort my issue out, but why is the hack necessary? And should we be doing this at all? The code base I'm in has dozens of instances where template classes have SOME specialisations of SOME of the member functions - not of the whole class. A colleague is adamant that this isn't allowed.

TIA.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

It should be int * const &. You have T = int *, so const T = T const = int * const.

Remember that U const & means "reference to constant U", and not "constant reference to U" — the latter doesn't make sense, since reference variables in C++ are always constant, i.e. cannot be reseated. In your case the U is a pointer-to-int, and not a pointer-to-const-int, which are two different types.

You can of course also add a separate specialization for int const *:

template <> void Boogy<int const *>::Fn2(int const * const & in) { /* ... */ }
share|improve this answer
    
Nice... subtle... –  Luchian Grigore May 29 '12 at 8:06
    
Of course! When you "read right to left" it suddenly makes sense. Kerrek SB, are you the little green guy who got Luke's X-Wing out of the swamp? ;-) As for the question of performing specialisation on some members of a template class - that's ok, right? –  Grimm The Opiner May 29 '12 at 8:20
1  
@LuchianGrigore: This is why I advertise going against the English of prepending const and always, systematically, put const after the type it qualifies. Only the inner type can be qualified before, it's too easy to mess it up :( –  Matthieu M. May 29 '12 at 8:20
    
@MatthieuM. Yep, once you read right to left it seems obvious. But I inherited ("inherited" as in someone else wrote it) the particular class and method I'm working with, the syntax was already in place. –  Grimm The Opiner May 29 '12 at 8:23
    
@user1158692: "const is my integer, hmm...?" –  Kerrek SB May 29 '12 at 8:27

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