Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I read this article cppnext implicit move but I didn't understand this problem:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
struct X
{
    // invariant: v.size() == 5
    X() : v(5) {}

    ~X()
    {
        std::cout << v[0] << std::endl;
    }

 private:    
    std::vector<int> v;
};

int main()
{
    std::vector<X> y;
    y.push_back(X()); // X() rvalue: copied in C++03, moved in C++0x
}

Under MSVC2010 there is no bug at runtime... Can anyone help me?

In this article there is this sentence :

The key problem here is that in C++03, X had an invariant that its v member always had 5 elements. X::~X() counted on that invariant, but the newly-introduced move constructor moved from v, thereby setting its length to zero.

I don't see why because we try to move X, v length would be zero

share|improve this question
    
Help you with what? –  Kerrek SB May 29 '12 at 10:05
    
Btw, when you have full C++11 support you could write y.emplace_back();. No temporary, nothing to copy or move. But I realise the point of the example isn't how best to add an element to a vector, it's to illustrate what would happen if the temporary was moved. –  Steve Jessop May 29 '12 at 10:59

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The problem the article is trying to illustrate is that when an X is moved in the push_back, the invariant is broken. The temporary X's vector v will be empty after moving, so the destructor call will invoke undefined behaviour. It could be that you see no problem because your compiler is not implementing move semantics, or because the undefined behaviour does not result in any perceptible runtime error through pure chance.

You can check this behaviour with this simple program, where we explicitly move an X instance:

#include <vector>
#include <iostream>
struct X {
  X() : v(5) {}
  std::vector<int> v;
};

int main() {
  X x0;
  std::cout << x0.v.size() << ", ";
  X x1 = std::move(x0);
  std::cout << x0.v.size() << "\n";
}

On GCC 4.7, these produce

5, 0

This comes from std::vector's move constructor, which is used by X's implicitly generated one. You can check std::vector directly:

int main() {
  std::vector<int> v0(5);
  std::cout << v0.size() << ", ";
  std::vector<int> v1 = std::move(v0);
  std::cout << v0.size() << "\n";
}

This produces the same output.

Now, in the example you quote, the presence of a user defined destructor means that there is no implicitly generated move constructor, so X is not moved in the push_back.

share|improve this answer
    
and why The temporary X's vector v will be empty after moving ? –  Guillaume07 May 29 '12 at 10:11
    
@Guillaume07 because that is how move is defined for a vector. –  juanchopanza May 29 '12 at 10:15
    
the first code under MSVC2010 give me 5,5 –  Guillaume07 May 29 '12 at 10:20
    
@Guillaume07 there could be many reasons for that (the standard does not determine exactly what state the moved source should be, only that it should be a valid, deletable object) , but you certainly cannot count on that result. You should see it as some kind of interesting fluke. –  juanchopanza May 29 '12 at 10:23
    
Oops, ignore me, I was commenting on my misunderstanding of what you were saying is a fluke. –  Steve Jessop May 29 '12 at 10:25

I don't see why because we try to move X, v length would be zero

Well, first of all we don't try to move the temporary X() in the push_back call. We do move it, or we don't[*].

If we were to move it (using an implicitly-generated move constructor), its data member v is moved. The assumption of the article is that moving from a vector leaves it empty, although I don't remember whether that's required or just typical. But it certainly does leave v in a state where it isn't guaranteed that you can access its former elements.

Remember, the whole point of moving is that it transfers expensive-to-copy resources from the source. So the temporary object is no longer guaranteed to have its internal array of 5 elements, because the destination of the move has taken it.

As to why it works in MSVC 2010 -- remember this code is presented in the article as an example just above "tweak #1 -- destructors suppress implicit move". C++11 does in fact contain this tweak -- no implicit move constructor is generated if there's a user-defined destructor (12.8/9). So the temporary is not moved, it's copied.

[*] Move or move not, there is no try. It's not up to the implementation whether or not to move it, the standard defines this.

share|improve this answer
    
implicit move constructor is generated if there's a user-defined destructor: yes indeed! –  Guillaume07 May 29 '12 at 10:27
    
@Guillaume07: no implicit move constructor is generated if there's a user-defined destructor. –  Steve Jessop May 29 '12 at 10:30
    
yes forgot the no ;) –  Guillaume07 May 29 '12 at 10:39
    
And even then, VC2010 doesn't generate implicit move constructors and assignment operators, anyway. –  Christian Rau May 29 '12 at 10:42
    
@Christian: ah, that would also explain it :-) Do you know, is it because they hadn't got around to it at the time, or because they believe the article linked here that implicit move is dangerous, and have decided to disobey the standard and never implement it? –  Steve Jessop May 29 '12 at 10:54

MSVC2010 does not implement auto=generated move constructors, so even if your code would have produced one, you won't see it there. Thus, as always, "random implementation X did Y" is a pretty meaningless statement to make.

share|improve this answer

In VS2010, the temporary will be be copied and then later destroyed. With move semantics, the temp object will simply be used for the vector.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.