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I would like to implement real functions in C++. In particular I would like to evaluate, differentiate, add, multiply such objects. Here is my implementation

class RealFunc {
public:
    virtual int Eval(const double& x, double& result) = 0;
    virtual int Diff(const double& x, double& result) = 0;
};

class Sqrt : public RealFunc {
public:
    int Eval(const double& x, double& result);
    int Diff(const double& x, double& result); 
};

int Sqrt::Eval(const double& x, double& result) {
    if(x<0) return 0;
    else {
        result = sqrt(x);
        return 1;
    }
};

int Sqrt::Diff(const double& x, double& result) {
    if(x<=0) return 0;
    else {
        result = 0.5/sqrt(x);
        return 1;
    }
};

It gets tricky when I try to add RealFunc objects. I have to create a sum class that inherits from RealFunc

RealFunc operator+(const RealFunc& f, const RealFunc& g) {
    Sum_RealFunc h(f,g);
    return h;
};

class Sum_RealFunc : public RealFunc {
public:
    Sum_RealFunc(const RealFunc& f_, const RealFunc& g_) : f(f_), g(g_) {};
    int Eval(const double& x, double& result);
    int Diff(const double& x, double& result);
private:
    RealFunc f;
    RealFunc g;
};

int Sum_RealFunc::Eval(const double& x, double& result) {
    double temp_f,temp_g;
    int success_f,success_g;
    success_f = f.Eval(x,temp_f);
    success_g = g.Eval(x,temp_g);
    result = temp_f+temp_g;
    return success_f*success_g;
};

// Same for Sum_RealFunc::Diff

My issue here is that I cannot use f,g as members in Sum_RealFunc since RealFunc is abstract... How should I proceed to get a clean implementation ?

PS : The code I put is a light version of what I am working on (functions from RxR->R with all differentiation directions, finite difference if stepsize member is not zero and other side functions)

share|improve this question
    
Your question is symptomatic of the XY Problem. Why do you think that you need a RealFunc abstract base class ? Why does this base class has double attributes ? It looks to me like a very confused design, and the solutions proposed so far are only going to complicate it. – Matthieu M. May 29 '12 at 10:32
    
You are right my problem is my design. The answers I got so far are quite complicated but my initial problem is quite simple. I would like to add functions basically, a function being an object containing its evaluation f(x) and its exact derivatives (although one could trigger an option to differentiate using finite differences). – vanna May 29 '12 at 10:52
1  
How would you evaluate higher order derivatives when diff returns a number? – user877329 May 29 '12 at 10:56
    
@MatthieuM. I think the problem is that in my implementation, the function sqrt is not an object of class RealFunc but another subclass. – vanna May 29 '12 at 10:59
    
@user877329 in this example Diff stands for "first derivative". In my real implementation I use functions of two variables and I am only interested in derivatives up to the second order so I got DiffX, DiffY, DiffXX for instance. – vanna May 29 '12 at 11:03
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Try

class Sum_RealFunc : public RealFunc {
    public:
        Sum_RealFunc(RealFunc& f_, RealFunc& g_) : f(f_), g(g_) {};
        int Eval(const double& x, double& result);
        int Diff(const double& x, double& result);
    private:
        RealFunc& f;
        RealFunc& g;
};

Now f and g are refernces instead which is fine.

share|improve this answer
1  
That's not safe: const references do prolong the lifetime of the variable to the frame of a directly-called function, but after that the the constructor is finished they will still leave scope, so Sum_RealFunc s(somefreefunc(foo), g); s.Eval(bar, baz) will not work. – leftaroundabout May 29 '12 at 10:56
    
Ok but when I implement Sum_RealFunc::Eval calls like f.Eval(x,result) returns the following error : cannot convert 'this' pointer from 'const RealFunc' to 'RealFunc &' – vanna May 29 '12 at 11:13
    
@vanna This is because you asserted that the sum does not change the state of a function. You now need to say: int Eval(const double& x,double& result) const; and the same for diff – user877329 May 29 '12 at 11:19
    
@leftaroundabout That is true. But just remove all const:s and we have forced somefreefunc to survive. Declaring Eval and Diff as const member functions is probably good anyway. – user877329 May 29 '12 at 11:24
    
I declared my functions const and it worked. This is what I needed, thanks a lot. – vanna May 29 '12 at 12:32

The problem you are facing is that you need both a feature that works well with value objects (operator overloading) and features that only works with pointers (inheritance/polymorphism).

As a solution, you'd need to have a value object with overloaded operators as a wrapper for polymorphic objects managed via pointers:

class RealFuncImpl {
public:
    virtual ~RealFuncImpl(); // don't forget this for polymorphic objects

    virtual int Eval(const double& x, double& result) = 0;
    virtual int Diff(const double& x, double& result) = 0;
};

class RealFunc {
    std::shared_ptr<RealFuncImpl> impl;
public:

    int Eval(const double& x, double& result);
    int Diff(const double& x, double& result);
};

You'd derive your Sum_RealFuncImpl from RealFuncImpl and implement your operators for RealFunc. You should probably hide away your Impl classes in some "detail" namespace, as your code's end user should never see them.

EDIT:

Your Sum_RealFuncImpl would contain two std::shared_ptr<RealFuncImpl> members.

share|improve this answer
    
I recommend NOT using shared_ptr, but rather using unique_ptr (in C++11) or scoped_ptr or simply redevelopping a Pimpl class (it's not so hard). You do not want shared ownership here. – Matthieu M. May 29 '12 at 10:27
    
@MatthieuM.: you need a way to clone the function objects to use unique_ptr practically. I you want to avoid that, shared_ptr is quite a reasonable compromise, though I agree it's not optimal. – leftaroundabout May 29 '12 at 10:28
    
@leftaroundabout: the problem is that in the OP design, the so called functions carry state, so sharing is not so reasonable. – Matthieu M. May 29 '12 at 10:33
    
@MatthieuM.: What state are you talking about? I don't see any state. The OP seems to expect to be able to treat the functions as (immutable) values, and to be allowed to copy them around. Hence, I stand by shared_ptr. – wolfgang May 29 '12 at 11:36
1  
@wolfgang: The Eval and Diff functions not being const (and Sum_RealFunc having two attributes), I assumed the OP wanted to have stateful functions. With hindsight, it seems the OP is simply not too C++ savvy. – Matthieu M. May 29 '12 at 12:31

Since you initialize them in the constructors initializer list, you can make the member variables references.

share|improve this answer
    
What do you mean ? If I change RealFunc f to RealFunc& f for instance the compiler tells me error C2440: 'initializing' : cannot convert from 'const RealFunc' to 'RealFunc &' – vanna May 29 '12 at 10:27
    
@vanna: that is because you are missing a const qualifier. – Matthieu M. May 29 '12 at 10:35

You have two possibilities:

  • Do as wolfgang suggested: use only a wrapper around a shared pointer. This way you can create copies without really having to copy the derived function objects.
  • Make the derived classes themselves copyable through a base-class pointer, by implementing a clone member. That's most conveniently done with deriving from a CRTP class instead of directly from the base class. I'd make it a local class, to not confuse things:

    struct RealFunc {
      virtual std::pair<double,bool> operator()       //IMO better than this
                              (double x)const =0;    // reference-argument hackery
      virtual std::pair<double,bool> Diff
                                 (double x)const =0;
    
      virtual RealFunc* clone()const =0;
      template<class Derived>
      struct implementation : RealFunc {
        RealFunc* clone() {
          return new Derived(*static_cast<const Derived*>(this));
        }
      };
    
      virtual ~RealFunc(){}
    };
    

    Now you just have to derive your function objects from implementation, to make them clonable:

    struct Sqrt : RealFunc::implementation<Sqrt> {
      std::pair<double,bool> operator()(double x) {
        return x>=0
                ? std::make_pair(sqrt(x), true)
                : std::make_pair(0., false);
      }
      ...
    }
    

    Your sum function can now be done nicely with std::unique_ptr:

    class Sum_RealFunc : public RealFunc::implementation<Sum_RealFunc> {
      std::vector<std::unique_ptr<RealFunc>> summands;
     public:
      std::pair<double,bool> operator()(double x) {
        double result=0;
        for(auto& f: summands) {
          auto r = (*f)(x);
          if(r.second) result += r.first;
           else return std::make_pair(0., false);
        }
        return std::make_pair(result, true);
      }
    
      Sum_RealFunc(const Sum_RealFunc& cpy) {
        for(auto& f: cpy.summands)
          summands.push_back(f->clone());
      }
    
      //friend operator+=(RealFunc& acc, const RealFunc& add); //doesn't work
    };
    

    Unfortunately, this is not enough indirection to allow writing simple sum expressions. I did something in a recent project that solved pretty much all of these issues, but was yet a bit more complicated: I gave every instance the option to override its behaviour with any other instance. Like

    class RealFunc {
      std::unique_ptr<RealFunc> override;
     public:
      virtual std::pair<double,bool> operator()(double x)const {
        return (*override)(x);
      }
      virtual std::pair<double,bool> Diff(double x)const {
        return override->Diff(x);
      }
    
      auto implemented() -> RealFunc*                              {
        return implement_override? override->implemented() : this; }
      auto implemented()const -> const RealFunc*                   {
        return implement_override? override->implemented() : this; }
    
      virtual RealFunc* clone()const =0;
      template<class Derived>
      struct implementation : RealFunc {
        virtual std::pair<double,bool> operator()(double x)const =0;
        virtual std::pair<double,bool> Diff(double x)const =0;
        RealFunc* clone() {
          return new Derived(*static_cast<const Derived*>(this));
        }
      };
    
      virtual ~RealFunc(){}
    };
    

    That's not all, you need to include a lot of checks for override everywhere with this approach. But in the end, it allows you to combine functions very smoothly, like

    RealFunc f = const_realfunc(7.);
    for(auto& omega: omegas)
      f += sine_angfreq(omega);
    RealFunc g = f + noise_func(.3);
    ...
    
share|improve this answer
    
Good point about returning std::pair<double,bool> instead of messing around with references. – wolfgang May 29 '12 at 11:41
    
What does all that complexity buy us? Rather than writing RealFunc myFun = f + g; we'd have to write something like... std::unique_ptr<Sum_RealFunc> myFun(new Sum_RealFunc); (*myFun) += *f; (*myFun) += *g; – wolfgang May 29 '12 at 11:44
    
You're right, this doesn't work with +=. – leftaroundabout May 29 '12 at 12:08
    
@wolfgang: actually, there is a NaN state in double so the boolean is unnecessary. – Matthieu M. May 29 '12 at 12:33
    
@MatthieuM. sure there is NaN, but that is very cumbersome: one easily forgets to check for it, and then you're stuck with those ugly hard-to-trace values failing to fulfill x==x. I'd only go that way if I had to optimise for memory and performance. — Returning always non-NaN doubles, but raising an exception in the case of failure might be a viable alternative. – leftaroundabout May 29 '12 at 12:51

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