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Yesterday i faced strange behavior of WebRequest and AppDomain.UnhandledException:

AppDomain.CurrentDomain.UnhandledException += (a, b) =>
            {
                Console.WriteLine("gotcha!");
            };
var request = WebRequest.Create("http://google.com");
request.BeginGetResponse((async) =>
            {
                Console.WriteLine("request finished");
                throw new Exception("done"); // exception does
                //not trigger AppDomain.Unhandledexception handler.
            }, null);
Console.WriteLine("request started");
Console.ReadLine();

Problem is that exception in response callback does not trigger UnhandledException event handler. I've checked in debugger - callback is executed in default domain. So apparently exception is caught somewhere before it reaches top of the stack. I'm curious about such behavior. Maybe i`m missing some point but it seems to me quite unexpected. So i would be happy if somebody clarifies. Code is console application running under .net 4.0.

share|improve this question
    
Have you set a breakpoint at Console.WriteLine("gotcha!")? what happens after Console.WriteLine("request started")? Does the program terminate before the request is finished? –  daveL May 29 '12 at 10:40
    
No there is a Console.ReadLine() in the end, so program does not not terminate (i`ve edited code). Yes there is breakpoint but it isn`t hit. Console window shows "request started", "request finished". Visual Studio warns about exception, and after skipping warn message nothing happens. So as i guess it is swallowed somewhere in the stack. I can definitely say that such behavior (swallowed exception in callback) is not feature of APM model. –  PolarPolecat May 29 '12 at 12:32

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