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I'm looking for a high-speed hashing function with good (i.e near uniform) distribution for use in a hash table implementation.

The hash table will be used exclusively for storing values with an integer key.

Can i just use the lower few bits of the integer as the hash?

e.g int key = n & 15; and create an array with 16 slots to store them.

Any recommendations?

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7  
There is no such thing as a perfect hash function. However, if you want some algorithms with corresponding source code, see here: partow.net/programming/hashfunctions/index.html –  David Brabant May 29 '12 at 10:39
    
Taking the lowest bits is probably the worst thing to do. (but: it all depends on the range of values you expect in your int key) Try to mix in the upper bits as well, or multiply with a large enough (odd, prime) number. Know what to expect and measure it. –  wildplasser May 29 '12 at 11:19
    
Post your comment as an answer and I will accept it. –  user1157123 May 31 '12 at 9:35

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can see here xxhash

Your mentioned hash function is very fast, but it is very bad too. If you want a "stupid" hash function maybe you can consider the modulus.

Example:

int key = item % size_of_hash_table
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Why is "it" bad? –  Austin Henley Oct 30 '12 at 16:52

Well, last night I made a versatile hash test (in C) which covers several top-gun hashers and 38 different keys.

You all are welcome to benchmark it at: http://www.overclock.net/t/1319572/benchmarking-the-fastest-hash-function/0_20#post_18495990

I would be glad for revealing how Intel vs AMD and Intel 12.1 compiler vs Microsoft 16 (VS2010) compiler combinations behave with your help.

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