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I am a noob Perl user trying to get my work done ASAP so I can go home on time today :)

Basically I need to print the next line of blank lines in a text file.

The following is what I have so far. It can locate blank lines perfectly fine. Now I just have to print the next line.

    open (FOUT, '>>result.txt');

die "File is not available" unless (@ARGV ==1);

open (FIN, $ARGV[0]) or die "Cannot open $ARGV[0]: $!\n";

@rawData=<FIN>;
$count = 0;

foreach $LineVar (@rawData)
    {
    	if($_ = ~/^\s*$/)
    	{
    		print "blank line \n";
                    #I need something HERE!!

    	}
    	print "$count \n";
    	$count++;
    }
close (FOUT);
close (FIN);

Thanks a bunch :)

share|improve this question
    
Is it sensible to slurp the whole file into memory? It isn't 100% necessary for the exercise shown. –  Jonathan Leffler Jul 3 '09 at 15:52
    
It isn't even 1% necessary, even if you want to use an array. Take a look at Tie::File (part of the core since 5.8, around 2002). –  Chas. Owens Jul 3 '09 at 16:56
    
File was not that big, but definitely it wasn't good idea. I will take a look at the Tie::File :) thanks –  b1gtuna Jul 3 '09 at 18:02

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted
open (FOUT, '>>result.txt');

die "File is not available" unless (@ARGV ==1);

open (FIN, $ARGV[0]) or die "Cannot open $ARGV[0]: $!\n";

$count = 0;

while(<FIN>)
{
    if($_ = ~/^\s*$/)
    {
            print "blank line \n";
            count++;
            <FIN>;
            print $_;

    }
    print "$count \n";
    $count++;
}
close (FOUT);
close (FIN);
  • not reading the entire file into @rawData saves memory, especially in the case of large files...

  • <FIN> as a command reads the next line into $_

  • print ; by itself is a synonym for print $_; (although I went for the more explicit variant this time...

share|improve this answer
1  
what happens with the above in the event where you have two blank lines in a row? presumably you would want to print the line following the 2nd blank line, but this code will skip such a line, will it not? –  si28719e Jul 3 '09 at 16:01
    
@blackkettle: very true. If that is a requirement, then Ron/malach's solution is better. –  Stobor Jul 3 '09 at 16:19
    
thanks a lot for your solution :) luckily my file did not have two blanks in a row. –  b1gtuna Jul 3 '09 at 18:00

Elaborating on Ron Savage's solution:

foreach $LineVar (@rawData)
    {
        if ( $lastLineWasBlank ) 
           {
                print $LineVar;
                $lastLineWasBlank = 0;
           }
        if($LineVar  =~ /^\s*$/)
        {
                print "blank line \n";
                    #I need something HERE!!
                $lastLineWasBlank = 1;
        }
        print "$count \n";
        $count++;
    }
share|improve this answer
    
I think you want if($LineVar =~ /^\s*$/) since you're not using $_ in the loop, are you? –  Telemachus Jul 3 '09 at 17:09
    
Also, do you want 0 and 1 where you have false and true? (No built-in booleans in Perl, are there?) –  Telemachus Jul 3 '09 at 17:15
    
so if I were to use this solution, do I need to put quotations around 'true' and 'false'? –  b1gtuna Jul 3 '09 at 18:01
    
Thanks for the corrections, haven't been doing Perl for quite a while –  malach Jul 3 '09 at 18:14
    
@mr.flow3r: No, you can't do it directly with 'true' and 'false', even if you quote them. (Well, unless you then test if $flag eq 'true' which is too wordy.) I would use 0 and 1 for simple booleans in Perl. –  Telemachus Jul 3 '09 at 18:36

I'd go like this but there's probably other ways to do it:

for ( my $i = 0 ; $i < @rawData ; $i++ ){
   if ( $rawData[$i] =~ /^\s*$/ ){
       print $rawData[$i + 1] ; ## plus check this is not null
   }
}

J.

share|improve this answer
    
Doesn't this just print all non blank lines? –  malach Jul 3 '09 at 15:19
sh> perl -ne 'if ($b) { print }; if ($b = !/\S/) { ++$c }; END { print $c,"\n" }'

Add input filename(s) to your liking.

share|improve this answer

Add a variable like $lastLineWasBlank, and set it at the end of each loop.

if ( $lastLineWasBlank ) 
   {
   print "blank line\n" . $LineVar;
   }

something like that. :-)

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