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How can I rotate the hue of an image using GDI+'s ImageAttributes (and presumably ColorMatrix)?

Note that I want to rotate the hue, not tint the image.

EDIT: By rotating the hue, I mean that each color in the image should be shifted to a different color, as opposed to making the entire image a shade of one color.

For example,

Original:

Rotated: or

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Thanks - I thought that might be what you were referring to, but it's best to be sure. –  ChrisF Jul 3 '09 at 15:29
    
You're welcome. –  SLaks Jul 3 '09 at 15:36

5 Answers 5

I threw this together for this question (ZIP file with c# project linked at the bottom of the post). It does not use ImageAttributes or ColorMatrix, but it rotates the hue as you've described:

//rotate hue for a pixel
private Color CalculateHueChange(Color oldColor, float hue)
{
    HLSRGB color = new HLSRGB(
        Convert.ToByte(oldColor.R),
        Convert.ToByte(oldColor.G),
        Convert.ToByte(oldColor.B));

    float startHue = color.Hue;
    color.Hue = startHue + hue;
    return color.Color;
}
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up vote 3 down vote accepted

I ended up porting QColorMatrix to C# and using its RotateHue method.

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Have you seen this article on CodeProject?

From an admittedly quick look at the page it looks like 4D maths. You can adopt a similar approach to contstructing matrices as you would for 2D or 3D maths.

Take a series of source "points" - in this case you'll need 4 - and the corresponding target "points" and generate a matrix. This can then be applied to any "point".

To do this in 2D (from memory so I could have made a complete howler in this):

Source points are (1, 0) and (0, 1). The targets are (0, -1) and (1,0). The matrix you need is:

(0, -1, 0)
(1,  0, 0)
(0,  0, 1)

Where the extra information is for the "w" value of the coordinate.

Extend this up to {R, G, B, A, w} and you'll have a matrix. Take 4 colours Red (1, 0, 0, 0, w), Green (0, 1, 0, 0, w), Blue (0, 0, 1, 0, w) and Transparent (0, 0, 0, 1, w). Work out what colours they map to in the new scheme and build up your matrix as follows:

(R1, G1, B1, A1, 0)
(R2, G2, B2, A2, 0)
(R3, G3, B3, A3, 0)
(R4, G4, B4, A4, 0)
(0,   0,   0,   0,   1)

NOTE: The order you do you mulitplication (vector * matrix or matrix * vector) will determine whether the transformed points go vertically or horizontally into this matrix, as matrix multiplication is non-commutative. I'm assuming vector * matrix.

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I suppose that www.aforgenet.com could help

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The following code constructs a ColorMatrix for applying a hue shift.

The insight i had was that at 60° shift in hue space:

  • red --> green
  • green --> blue
  • blue --> red

is actually a 45° shift in RGB space:

enter image description here

So you can turn some fraction of a 120° shift into some fraction of a 90° shift.

The HueShift parameter must be a value between -1..1.

For example, in order to apply a 60° shift:

  • changing red to yellow,
  • changing yellow to green
  • changing green to cyan
  • changing cyan to blue
  • changing blue to magenta
  • changing magenta to red

you call:

var cm = GetHueShiftColorMatrix(60/360); //a value between 0..1

Implementation:

function GetHueShiftColorMatrix(HueShift: Real): TColorMatrix;
var
    theta: Real;
    c, s: Real;
const
    wedge = 120/360;
begin
    if HueShift > 1 then
        HueShift := 0
    else if HueShift < -1 then
        HueShift := 0
    else if Hueshift < 0 then
        HueShift := 1-HueShift;

    if (HueShift >= 0) and (HueShift <= wedge) then
    begin
        //Red..Green
        theta := HueShift / wedge*(pi/2);
        c := cos(theta);
        s := sin(theta);

        cm[0, 0] :=  c; cm[0, 1] :=  0; cm[0, 2] :=  s; cm[0, 3] :=  0; cm[0, 4] := 0;
        cm[1, 0] :=  s; cm[1, 1] :=  c; cm[1, 2] :=  0; cm[1, 3] :=  0; cm[1, 4] := 0;
        cm[2, 0] :=  0; cm[2, 1] :=  s; cm[2, 2] :=  c; cm[2, 3] :=  0; cm[2, 4] := 0;
        cm[3, 0] :=  0; cm[3, 1] :=  0; cm[3, 2] :=  0; cm[3, 3] :=  1; cm[3, 4] := 0;
        cm[4, 0] :=  0; cm[4, 1] :=  0; cm[4, 2] :=  0; cm[4, 3] :=  0; cm[4, 4] := 1;
    end
    else if (HueShift >= wedge) and (HueShift <= (2*wedge)) then
    begin
        //Green..Blue
        theta := (HueShift-wedge) / wedge*(pi/2);
        c := cos(theta);
        s := sin(theta);

        cm[0, 0] :=  0; cm[0, 1] :=  s; cm[0, 2] :=  c; cm[0, 3] :=  0; cm[0, 4] := 0;
        cm[1, 0] :=  c; cm[1, 1] :=  0; cm[1, 2] :=  s; cm[1, 3] :=  0; cm[1, 4] := 0;
        cm[2, 0] :=  s; cm[2, 1] :=  c; cm[2, 2] :=  0; cm[2, 3] :=  0; cm[2, 4] := 0;
        cm[3, 0] :=  0; cm[3, 1] :=  0; cm[3, 2] :=  0; cm[3, 3] :=  1; cm[3, 4] := 0;
        cm[4, 0] :=  0; cm[4, 1] :=  0; cm[4, 2] :=  0; cm[4, 3] :=  0; cm[4, 4] := 1;
    end
    else
    begin
        //Blue..Red
        theta := (HueShift-2*wedge) / wedge*(pi/2);
        c := cos(theta);
        s := sin(theta);

        cm[0, 0] :=  s; cm[0, 1] :=  c; cm[0, 2] :=  0; cm[0, 3] :=  0; cm[0, 4] := 0;
        cm[1, 0] :=  0; cm[1, 1] :=  s; cm[1, 2] :=  c; cm[1, 3] :=  0; cm[1, 4] := 0;
        cm[2, 0] :=  c; cm[2, 1] :=  0; cm[2, 2] :=  s; cm[2, 3] :=  0; cm[2, 4] := 0;
        cm[3, 0] :=  0; cm[3, 1] :=  0; cm[3, 2] :=  0; cm[3, 3] :=  1; cm[3, 4] := 0;
        cm[4, 0] :=  0; cm[4, 1] :=  0; cm[4, 2] :=  0; cm[4, 3] :=  0; cm[4, 4] := 1;
    end;

    Result := cm;
end;
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