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Schema.org provides a schema for each useful content in the Web. For instance, here you can find the schema of a "Recipe". As you may see, there are several properties that are expected to be text (see for instance recipeCategory). However, there are properties that can include html img tags, e.g. the recipeInstructions should include textual and visual instructions. Do you think that is correct to include an image inside a property that is expected to be text? In practice, do you think that is correct the following code:

<div itemprop="recipeInstructions">
  <p>Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Mix in the ingredients in a bowl.</p> 
  <img src="path" title="Mixed ingredients">
  <p>Add the flour last. Pour the mixture into a loaf pan and bake for one hour.</p>
</div>

or the next one:

<div itemprop="recipeInstructions">
  <p>Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Mix in the ingredients in a bowl.</p> 
  <p>Add the flour last. Pour the mixture into a loaf pan and bake for one hour.</p>
</div>

Moreover, which is the impact on search engines?

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In addition, I report what the schema.org states here: "Expected types vs text. When browsing the schema.org types, you will notice that many properties have "expected types". This means that the value of the property can itself be an embedded item (see section 1d: embedded items). But this is not a requirement—it's fine to include just regular text or a URL. In addition, whenever an expected type is specified, it is also fine to embed an item that is a child type of the expected type." –  JeanValjean May 29 '12 at 12:28

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

As far as the <img> is concerned, the first markup is fine.

From the microdata spec the value of itemprop on a span element is the span's textContent.

textContent is defined in DOM4 as

The concatenation of data of all the Text node descendants of the context object, in tree order.

So, since the <img> is not a text node, and has no text node descendents, it is simply ignored for the purposes of establishing the value for the itemprop.

There's no reason to believe that search engines that pay any attention to microdata would not follow the specs here.


As an aside, though, it's not valid to put <p> elements inside <span> elements. You may wish to fix that by using a <div> instead. The value of the itemprop would not be affected by making that change.

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Thank you for the info. Of course, The <p> tag inside the <span> was an error! I did a cut and paste from the schema.org website and then I did a brief editing of their example! Regards. –  JeanValjean May 29 '12 at 13:10
    
Well, what about putting an anchor tag (<a>) just inside the text? Do you think that the search engines will get only the text inside the <a></a> tags? –  JeanValjean May 29 '12 at 13:11

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